6 Replies Latest reply on Oct 9, 2015 3:22 PM by leibfritz

    SolarWinds SNMP Polling Never Stops for Switches

    leibfritz

      It appears the SolarWinds SNMP polling of a network switch never stops.  The traffic is constant. I tried changing the "Poll for topology data" interval to 7 days and increased the "Node status polling" and "Collect Statistics Every" intervals also but nothing seems to help?

        • Re: SolarWinds SNMP Polling Never Stops for Switches
          Craig Norborg

          Maybe some more details?   What kind of switch?   What are you set up to poll in terms of interfaces and such on "list resources"?

           

          The topology data is a very minimal part of what Solarwinds polls for.   I think by default that interval is quite long.  What you would want to adjust would be the "Default Node Statistics Inverval" and "Default Interface Statistics Poll Interval".   Its possible that you might need to do Volume's also, but I don't think with switches thats a big issue...   You could have set up custom polling intervals for that node also.

          • Re: SolarWinds SNMP Polling Never Stops for Switches
            cjfranca

            If you can collect the flow of this switch is good to know what
            It is passed in the band, which application is so band.

              • Re: SolarWinds SNMP Polling Never Stops for Switches
                leibfritz

                13:35:02.770234 IP 10.3.6.13.161 > 164.54.22.187.57513:  C=XXXXXXX GetResponse(105)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.73="D1" .1.3[|snmp]

                13:35:02.771073 IP 164.54.22.187.57513 > 10.3.6.13.161:  C=XXXXXXX GetRequest(94)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.74 .1.3.6.1[|snmp]

                13:35:02.776181 IP 10.3.6.13.161 > 164.54.22.187.57513:  C=XXXXXXX GetResponse(105)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.74="D2" .1.3[|snmp]

                13:35:02.777080 IP 164.54.22.187.57513 > 10.3.6.13.161:  C=XXXXXXX GetRequest(94)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.75 .1.3.6.1[|snmp]

                13:35:02.782440 IP 10.3.6.13.161 > 164.54.22.187.57513:  C=XXXXXXX GetResponse(104)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.75="D3" .1.3[|snmp]

                13:35:02.783178 IP 164.54.22.187.57513 > 10.3.6.13.161:  C=XXXXXXX GetRequest(94)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.77 .1.3.6.1[|snmp]

                13:35:02.788395 IP 10.3.6.13.161 > 164.54.22.187.57513:  C=XXXXXXX GetResponse(102)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.77="D5" .1.3[|snmp]

                13:35:02.789156 IP 164.54.22.187.57513 > 10.3.6.13.161:  C=XXXXXXX GetRequest(94)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.82 .1.3.6.1[|snmp]

                13:35:02.794391 IP 10.3.6.13.161 > 164.54.22.187.57513:  C=XXXXXXX GetResponse(107)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.82="D10" [|snmp]

                13:35:02.795183 IP 164.54.22.187.57513 > 10.3.6.13.161:  C=XXXXXXX GetRequest(94)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.83 .1.3.6.1[|snmp]

                13:35:02.801109 IP 10.3.6.13.161 > 164.54.22.187.57513:  C=XXXXXXX GetResponse(106)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.83="D11" [|snmp]

                13:35:02.801949 IP 164.54.22.187.57513 > 10.3.6.13.161:  C=XXXXXXX GetRequest(94)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.89 .1.3.6.1[|snmp]

                13:35:02.807090 IP 10.3.6.13.161 > 164.54.22.187.57513:  C=XXXXXXX GetResponse(104)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.89="D17" [|snmp]

                13:35:02.808156 IP 164.54.22.187.57513 > 10.3.6.13.161:  C=XXXXXXX GetRequest(94)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.90 .1.3.6.1[|snmp]

                13:35:02.813946 IP 10.3.6.13.161 > 164.54.22.187.57513:  C=XXXXXXX GetResponse(106)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.90="D18" [|snmp]

                13:35:02.814893 IP 164.54.22.187.57513 > 10.3.6.13.161:  C=XXXXXXX GetRequest(94)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.91 .1.3.6.1[|snmp]

                13:35:02.820527 IP 10.3.6.13.161 > 164.54.22.187.57513:  C=XXXXXXX GetResponse(106)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.91="D19" [|snmp]

                13:35:03.630876 IP 164.54.22.187.57513 > 10.3.6.13.161:  C=XXXXXXX GetRequest(94)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.1 .1.3.6.1[|snmp]

                13:35:03.637001 IP 10.3.6.13.161 > 164.54.22.187.57513:  C=XXXXXXX GetResponse(105)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.1="A1" .1.3[|snmp]

                13:35:03.637764 IP 164.54.22.187.57513 > 10.3.6.13.161:  C=XXXXXXX GetRequest(94)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.2 .1.3.6.1[|snmp]

                13:35:03.642932 IP 10.3.6.13.161 > 164.54.22.187.57513:  C=XXXXXXX GetResponse(104)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.2="A2" .1.3[|snmp]

                13:35:03.643848 IP 164.54.22.187.57513 > 10.3.6.13.161:  C=XXXXXXX GetRequest(94)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.3 .1.3.6.1[|snmp]

                13:35:03.649158 IP 10.3.6.13.161 > 164.54.22.187.57513:  C=XXXXXXX GetResponse(104)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.3="A3" .1.3[|snmp]

                13:35:03.650113 IP 164.54.22.187.57513 > 10.3.6.13.161:  C=XXXXXXX GetRequest(94)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.26 .1.3.6.1[|snmp]

                13:35:03.655642 IP 10.3.6.13.161 > 164.54.22.187.57513:  C=XXXXXXX GetResponse(105)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.26="B2" .1.3[|snmp]

                13:35:03.656461 IP 164.54.22.187.57513 > 10.3.6.13.161:  C=XXXXXXX GetRequest(94)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.30 .1.3.6.1[|snmp]

                13:35:03.660709 IP 10.3.6.13.161 > 164.54.22.187.57513:  C=XXXXXXX GetResponse(102)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.30="B6" .1.3[|snmp]

                13:35:03.661533 IP 164.54.22.187.57513 > 10.3.6.13.161:  C=XXXXXXX GetRequest(94)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.31 .1.3.6.1[|snmp]

                13:35:03.665726 IP 10.3.6.13.161 > 164.54.22.187.57513:  C=XXXXXXX GetResponse(102)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.31="B7" .1.3[|snmp]

                13:35:03.666383 IP 164.54.22.187.57513 > 10.3.6.13.161:  C=XXXXXXX GetRequest(94)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.32 .1.3.6.1[|snmp]

                13:35:03.671069 IP 10.3.6.13.161 > 164.54.22.187.57513:  C=XXXXXXX GetResponse(102)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.32="B8" .1.3[|snmp]

                13:35:03.672138 IP 164.54.22.187.57513 > 10.3.6.13.161:  C=XXXXXXX GetRequest(94)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.33 .1.3.6.1[|snmp]

                13:35:03.676502 IP 10.3.6.13.161 > 164.54.22.187.57513:  C=XXXXXXX GetResponse(102)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.33="B9" .1.3[|snmp]

                13:35:03.677209 IP 164.54.22.187.57513 > 10.3.6.13.161:  C=XXXXXXX GetRequest(94)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.34 .1.3.6.1[|snmp]

                13:35:03.681603 IP 10.3.6.13.161 > 164.54.22.187.57513:  C=XXXXXXX GetResponse(106)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.34="B10" [|snmp]

                13:35:03.690752 IP 164.54.22.187.57513 > 10.3.6.13.161:  C=XXXXXXX GetRequest(94)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.35 .1.3.6.1[|snmp]

                13:35:03.695073 IP 10.3.6.13.161 > 164.54.22.187.57513:  C=XXXXXXX GetResponse(106)  .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.35="B11" [|snmp]

                 

                The SNMP traffic is mostly polling the interfaces.

                  • Re: SolarWinds SNMP Polling Never Stops for Switches
                    Craig Norborg

                    How many active interfaces are there?

                     

                    After you changed the default polling intervals, did you hit the "Re-Apply Polling Intervals" button?   If you only hit submit, it would only change it for new interfaces managed I believe.  The way you can check this is by bringing up Node Details on that node and then clicking on one of the Interfaces on that box so you're in Interface Details.  There should be a box that is "Interface Polling Details" and in there it will tell you what your intervals are.

                     

                    I don't believe it necessarily polls all interfaces for a given box at once, so if you have 100 interfaces being monitored on a box, and you have your polling interval set to 6 minutes for interfaces, you should potentially get on interface polled once every 3.6 seconds >on average<.    Then you also have to think about the fact that when polling an interface it probably wants multiple values, lets say "in bytes", "out bytes", "in packets", "out packets", "in errors", "out errors"?  I'm just guessing there, but that would be 6 separate values it polls for?   So lets take the 3.6 seconds and divide by 6 and that would be one poll every .6 seconds on average...  In other words, there is a lot of polling going on!!

                     

                    The polling traffic could be rather bursty too, it might poll 50 interfaces at the same time, then spread out the rest over the next 6 minutes.   Not to mention there are other polls going on, like rediscoveries, maybe volumes, etc. etc...