1 Reply Latest reply on Oct 31, 2014 5:59 AM by reshma.Mamangalavan

    Some VM MAC Addresses don't show up in UDT

    kendalcm

      I have 2 VM hosts each with 3 vmnics teamed together for the VMs to use to access the network.  The host NICs are then plugged into 2 HP Procurve switches in ports 8,10,12.  None of the VM MAC addresses show up on these ports even though they show up in switch's MAC tables.  I've also noticed that MACs don't show up on uplinks to other switches...which is good.  So, how does UDT define an uplink?  How do I get UDT to differentiate between an uplink to a VM host and an uplink to a switch?

       

      Attached is a picture of one of the switches...ports 8,10,12 are uplinks to VM Hosts (vSwitch) and ports 21,22,24 are uplinks to other switches

        • Re: Some VM MAC Addresses don't show up in UDT
          reshma.Mamangalavan

          How does UDT define an uplink?

          Depending on where the traffic is coming from (more than 2 VLANS) and how many endpoints are connected, the 'Uplink' port the VMWare host is connected to may be determined by UDT to be a 'trunk' port.

           

          The MAC address table of the switch would be displaying the MAC’s of the virtual servers, as such UDT will be applying the Connection Type determination rules to this uplink port and therefore depending on the number of endpoints (virtual servers) connected and the number of vlans the traffic is coming from; the Connection Type will change.

           

          If the traffic passing through connection has packets for more than 2 VLANs and if there is more than a specified number of endpoints connected to the port (i.e. if more than 8 endpoints, UDT determines port to be trunk/indirect)

           

          How do I get UDT to differentiate between an uplink to a VM host and an uplink to a switch?

          There is no specific logic to differentiate uplink port to a VM host and an uplink to a switch or router.

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