1 Reply Latest reply on Apr 21, 2014 5:03 PM by Lawrence Garvin

    Update forcing browser to close

    jbeardnc

      New to Patch Manager and Thwack. Hello everyone.

       

      We just purchased PM to use along side of ConfigMgr 2012 and in the past, to update Java or Flash, I would write a script to push out to machines that would prompt the user to close IE and it would then continue with the update. I'm excited to start using PM but in testing, I noticed that both Java and Flash upgrades force IE to close without notice before the update is installed. How are people dealing with updates that require/force IE (or another app) to close? Are you using a custom Package Boot for it to run a script beforehand that prompts the user? Is that the recommended way to handle updates that require action before installing? Most of the Package Boot Editor seems pretty self explanatory but if there is a write-up for tips and tricks on the best way to use that, I'd be interested if you could send me a link.

       

      Note: I thought about using maintenance windows so that those updates would only install in the middle of the night and wouldn't impact the user but a lot of people shut down their computers at night so that's not ideal.

       

      Any ideas are welcome.

       

      Thanks,

      James

        • Re: Update forcing browser to close
          Lawrence Garvin
          How are people dealing with updates that require/force IE (or another app) to close?

          Most organizations don't patch desktop applications during the workday, so this is not normally an issue.

           

          but a lot of people shut down their computers at night so that's not ideal.

           

          This is a human resource and operations management issue. If Technology Management requires that systems be powered on once a month to install patches, that's a behavior that will have to be trained. Implementing non-optimal patch management procedures because business practices are not optimal for the patch management to occur is ignoring the core issue.


          The need of the organization is to apply patches to desktop systems in a timely manner while minimizing interruption to the user is the core issue. The user must cooperate in that venture. If the user fails to leave their system powered on when instructed to do so; then by all means do what is necessary (including disrupting that user's workday) to get the patches installed. I promise you.... the user will eventually learn the preferred behavior. ;-)


          But don't *plan* to disrupt all users' workday without first trying the better solution. :-)