3 Replies Latest reply on Jul 13, 2012 10:51 AM by Lawrence Garvin

    PatchManager causes "Dirty Enviroment" in MDT 2012 Deployment

    sysadminchris

      I am using MDT2012 with Solarwinds PatchManager for OS deployment, and it's almost working perfectly.  However, my Windows Update task sequence (which is where PatchManager installs it's software), causes a reboot.  Upon rebooting, the following error comes up.

      http://social.microsoft.com/Forums/getfile/57172/

       

      I have tried everything to get rid of reboots, and I have the applications set to never require a reboot.  How can I make sure PatchManager doesn't automatically reboot my computers during my deployment process?  The applications in question are Adobe Reader X, JRE and Flash Player.

       

      Thanks,

      Chris

        • Re: PatchManager causes "Dirty Enviroment" in MDT 2012 Deployment
          Lawrence Garvin

          Can you give me a bit more detail on the sequence of events in this process. How is MDT2012 fitting into this process; I'm assuming you're launching an Update Deployment task from Patch Manager -- but is this before, or after, MDT completes the full OS deployment (including a system restart)?

            • Re: PatchManager causes "Dirty Enviroment" in MDT 2012 Deployment
              sysadminchris

              In my MDT2012 task sequence, I have a Windows Update task (twice actually).  My software packages / windows updates are pulled down from patchmanager via Windows Update at the same time, as per Microsoft's recommended way of updating.  Does anyone know why PatchManager uses the .exe instead of .msi file to install adobe?  Is it because it's a pain to deploy all the patches with the .msi when deploying?

               

              deploymenttask.pngadobereboot.png

                • Re: PatchManager causes "Dirty Enviroment" in MDT 2012 Deployment
                  Lawrence Garvin

                  Thank you for the details.

                   

                  So, first, let's clarify a few things. Your client is not pulling any updates from Patch Manager at all; in fact Patch Manager has no role in this process whatsoever. The client (Windows Update Agent) always pulls updates from the WSUS server. Patch Manager provides two tools (Update Management; Update Management Wizard) that talk to the Windows Update Agent and tell it what to go get from the WSUS server, but it's my understanding those tools are not in play here.

                   

                  All of the standard rules apply to installing anything via the Windows Update Agent. Installations may require a system restart, depending on the state of the machine when the installation is run. We have seen scenarios in which Adobe Reader triggers a restart. It seems to me that what's happening here is that the WUAgent-initiated installation is triggering and executing a system restart -- but the MDT process is not in a state to handle a system restart -- so after the system restart you're gettign the dialog that's basically saying, "Hey, this process is not copasetic and I can't fix it. Do you want to throw away the work so far and restart the deployment (YES), or do you want to ignore this unexpected state (NO)?"

                   

                  I believe the message you are getting about the existing in-progress deployment is a direct result of trying to install applications in this manner, but I have very little experience with MDT so this is pure speculation on my part. I would recommend inquiring in the Technet MDT forums, generically, about the implications of installing applications or updates at that point in the cycle where this is happening.

                   

                  The conventional approach would be to complete the OS deployment, restart the system, and then trigger the WUAgent scan of the WSUS server to identify available updates. A post-OS-deployment immediate installation can be triggered by placing these new systems in a special WSUS Target Group and approving the updates for that Target Group using an expired deadline.