14 Replies Latest reply on Nov 30, 2013 2:09 PM by Lawrence Garvin

    Java autoupdater enable after update

    pidom

      We have juste applied the Java Runtime Environment 6u32 (x86 for x64) (Upgrade) package in our environement.  Even if the  command line parameter are set to /s "JAVAUPDATE=0 AgreeToLicense=YES" within the package, the java updater proccess is running on the target computer and users receive a prompt asking them to upgrade to the latest version wich is 1.6u33. We have modify the package to add these command line argument /s "JAVAUPDATE=0 AgreeToLicense=YES AUTOUPDATECHECK=0 JU=0" with the same result. Since we use patch manager to control the whole update process, these message are realy annoying. We know we could disable these message Using a gpo but we would prefer to disable the autoupdater within the installation package.

       

      Any idea how to disable Java autoupdater within the update package?

       

      Regards

       

       

       

       


        • Re: Java autoupdater enable after update
          jmerwin

          We had the same problem. We fixed it by adding a reg.exe command to the post execution section of the java packages. Delete

          "SunJavaUpdateSched" from HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run

           

           

          1 of 1 people found this helpful
          • Re: Java autoupdater enable after update
            antwesor

            Another alternative is to change the registry key for updating Java.

            For Windows 7 :

            HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\JavaSoft\Java Update\Policy\EnableJavaUpdate=0

            For Windows XP

            HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\JavaSoft\Java Update\Policy\EnableJavaUpdate=0

            1 of 1 people found this helpful
            • Re: Java autoupdater enable after update
              strict

              I have used these reg edits:

               

              64 bit OS:

              [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\JavaSoft\Java Update\Policy]

              "EnableJavaUpdate"=dword:00000000

              "EnableAutoUpdateCheck"=dword:00000000

               

              32 bit OS:

              [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\JavaSoft\Java Update\Policy]

              "EnableJavaUpdate"=dword:00000000

              "EnableAutoUpdateCheck"=dword:00000000

              • Re: Java autoupdater enable after update
                strict

                So I must say, us having to 'work around' these java updates is not what I signed up for.  Obviously the "PM Sun Package Guru" agrees Java should not be trying to update itself because they are adding JAVAUPDATE=0 to the command line arguments.  If JAVAUPDATE=0 is not doing the trick, then the "PM Sun Package Guru" should be doing something that works, as opposed to having us deal with it.

                  • Re: Java autoupdater enable after update
                    Lawrence Garvin

                    As a matter of practice, packages in the catalog from SolarWinds are not configured to disable any autoupdaters. That's not to say that this is a written-in-stone practice, but it is worthy of note that adding disabling of autoupdaters to our packages would increase the amount of QA effort we must do on each and every package. Inasmuch as turning off an autoupdater is usually a one-time task (enable a policy, disable a service, set/reset a registry value), we've opted to not expend the extra effort on the added functionality in the interest of getting the packages in the catalog for your use sooner, rather than later.

                     

                    However, we are certainly interested in your feedback on this practice!

                     

                    Regarding the JAVAUPDATE=0 parameter, we use that parameter to temporarily disable the JavaAutoUpdater so that it's potential activity does not conflict with the WUAgent's installation of the update. It's presence is a legacy holdover from the earlier JRE packages that were built.

                     

                    As Dominic notes in his original post, the addition of the parameters AUTOUPDATECHECK=0 JU=0 may be able to be used to disable the autoupdater, but these parameters were deprecated in JRE6u10 -- which simply means they may, or may not, work in future versions. It appears to have not worked when installing the JRE6u32 update. In JRE6u18 the JavaAutoUpdater was introduced as a separate executable. The recommended practice now is to uninstall that utility. You can do this in a Post-Execution Uninstall task in PackageBoot by uninstalling ProductID {4A03706F-666A-4037-7777-5F2748764D10}.

                     

                    A few weeks ago I found a great explanation of these parameters, their lifecycle, and the new methodologies at http://wpkg.org/Java.

                      • Re: Java autoupdater enable after update
                        doverhimself

                        I have to agree with Mark R.. In the case of Java I believe that the extra QA effort should be taken on the packages that we are being given.  The 'added functionality' of getting Java security patch packages that do not have a serious flaw that needs to be worked out by each of us is, in my opinion, well worth the wait. 

                        • Re: Java autoupdater enable after update
                          iroqouiz

                          I agree with doverhimself. I assumed when I bought the product that Solarwinds would take care of and disable all auto update functionality in the packages. I have to say, Patch Manager isn't saving me a lot of time as I have to manually do a lot of work to make sure Skype, Java, iTunes, Adobe Reader etc aren't causing popups to appear for our end users. It's a neat tool since the packages are synced automatically and all that, but this will be a deal breaker for me if it isn't fixed, and I will not continue using and paying for PM.

                            • Re: Java autoupdater enable after update
                              Lawrence Garvin

                              As is noted several times in this thread, the auto-updater is disabled via a registry setting.

                              The proper way to implement a registry setting is with Group Policy.

                              Ergo, Patch Manager is the wrong tool, which is why we don't do it in the packages.

                               

                              You can find the Group Policy template to disable the autoupdater here.

                                • Re: Java autoupdater enable after update
                                  iroqouiz

                                  Thanks for your reply. If the registry keys are in HKLM it would be possible to do in a package boot step, no?

                                   

                                  By the way, do you have any idea about how to efficiently turn off the new prompts in Java 7 which blocks access if the version is not the newest? The prompt gives you the option to update, block, or choose later. I've been scouring the internet for solutions but I can't seem to find any definitive answers, and the ones I've tried do not give consistent results.

                                   

                                  Thanks.

                                    • Re: Java autoupdater enable after update
                                      Lawrence Garvin

                                      If the registry keys are in HKLM it would be possible to do in a package boot step, no?

                                      Certainly it is possible, but doing so is not worth the effort needed to test the methdology when Group Policy is a much simpler and proven technology. Furthermore, you would actually have to deploy an update to a machine to disable the autoupdater. Isn't the desire to disable the autoupdater everywhere, universally and permanently? Group Policy is the correct technology to use for this purpose. Finally, if you have any systems that have application dependencies on older versions of JRE, then you'll have to modify and test multiple packages. (Already you'll have to modify and test three packages at a minimum: x86, x64, and x86-on-x64).

                                      By the way, do you have any idea about how to efficiently turn off the new prompts in Java 7 which blocks access if the version is not the newest?

                                      I don't know about any prompts in JRE7 that do this. There is a prompt on JRE6 systems that invokes the upgrade to JRE7. The fix here is to uninstall JRE7 / upgraded to JRE7.

                                      If similar prompts have been added to JRE7 to get the latest updates, then it seems that the fix would be to either update the system, or disable the autoupdater (if it can't be updated).

                                        • Re: Java autoupdater enable after update
                                          iroqouiz

                                          This is the prompt I'm talking about. Not just me experiencing this and it's obviously not PM related, but a prompt from Oracle. I was just wondering if you'd seen it and knew anything about it. It's very annoying to have 2 ( ! ) prompts now. The screenshot is not the exact one I'm referring to, it's supposed to say "Your Java version is out of date", I just googled and found this.

                                           

                                          XGDdzpS.png

                                            • Re: Java autoupdater enable after update
                                              Lawrence Garvin

                                              I do believe that prompt is caused because JRE7 is still installed on the machine. It's triggered by the JRE6 autoupdater (because there are no more update for JRE6 and Oracle  has coded that response from the web server side of the autoupdater's connection).

                                               

                                              Take special note, if you deployed JRE7 using Patch Manager, then JRE6 is not uninstalled by anything. Only if you upgrade JRE6 to JRE7 via the autoupdater is JRE6 specifically uninstalled. You should check the software inventory on your systems for the presence of a JRE6 installation.