14 Replies Latest reply on Nov 10, 2010 8:06 PM by rsprim

    SQL 2008 Tweaking

    jonchill

      Are there any changes you recommend to be made to SQL 2008 from a base install?

      We don't have a DB team so we're managing the SQL servers ourselves.

      Thanks

      Jon

        • Re: SQL 2008 Tweaking

          I also would be interested in an answer to this.

          • Re: SQL 2008 Tweaking
            esamurai

            Me three - Any recommendations woudl be helpful. Having problems.

              • Re: SQL 2008 Tweaking
                pvaldes

                BUMP

                Anyone? I'm using SQL 2008 as well.

                Here is my setup and right now I have 14Gig on my DB server running at 45% memory use. My server is capable of up to a max of 32Gig of RAM (Windows 2K8 Standard limitations booooo).

                ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                Server 1 - WEB Server
                Hardware: DL360 G6 L5520, 4Gig RAM RDIMM, 70gig HD 15K RPM RAID 1+0 array 512Mb backup kit
                Software: Windows 2K3 SP2 32bit, NPM SLX, NTA SLX, NCM 100

                Server 2 - DB Server
                Hardware: DL360 G6 E5540, 14Gig RAM RDIMM, 140gig HD 15K RPM RAID 1+0 array 512Mb backup kit
                Software: Windows 2K8 SP2 64bit, SQL Server 2K8 64bit

                  • Re: SQL 2008 Tweaking
                    jlintner

                    As for memory - I think you're OK at 14GB.

                    I'm not a DBA either, but this is kind of standard DBA practice:  keep the DB log files on different physical disks from the database files, and also look at the TEMP database - that one seems to get a lot of activity.  Don't put the Temp or Orion database files (logs and/or database files) on the system drive.  YOU NEED ADDITIONAL PHYSICAL HARD DISKS TO KEEP THE DB SERVER UNDER CONTROL.  Watch your disk que time for all hard disks - that will tell you if there is contention. 

                    For starters, I would do this for disks:

                    • RAID 1 (2 drives) - System/OS
                    • RAID 1 (2 drives) - Temp DB files (log and database files)
                    • RAID 1 (2 drives) - Other database (Orion databases) log files
                    • RAID 1 (2 drives) - Other database (Orion databases) database files

                    So that would be four, individual RAID 1 arrays; possibly eight disks?  If performance is lacking, you would have to look at RAID 10 arrays.  Or use SAN attached storage...