7 Replies Latest reply on Aug 2, 2008 1:55 PM by CapTech

    Customer question - continuous throughput verses bursting

      A colocation prospect asks me how long will a given burst have to last before it is converted from a finger pointing upward on the bandwidth monitor graph to the solid line representing continuous throughput?


       I imagine that this has to do with how often your system polls the switch, and ours is set to whatever the default is, every couple of minutes seems like, but still I think it's an interesting question?  Say the system polls the switch and sees that your interface is doing four megs.  Then it polls it again a couple of minutes later and sees only a half a meg, then that four megs would have shown on the graph as a burst.  But say it still sees the four megs of traffic outbound from the customer (inbound to the switch) when it polls the next time, and maybe the time after that.  How many times will it have to see this four megs before it converts that burst on the graph to a solid line representing continous throughput?


       Thanks whoever tackles this one!

        • Re: Customer question - continuous throughput verses bursting
          Andy McBride

          Hi CapTech,


          Which view are you looking at and what is you Orion polling period? I'm assuming you are talking about Orion IF views and not NTA but let me know if this is an incorrect assumption.


          Andy


            • Re: Customer question - continuous throughput verses bursting

              Unfortunately the network tech is out today, I'm just the sales weasel.  All I know really is that the main Solar Winds screen is showing and it lists all the interfaces it polls along the left-hand side with status in the big window on the right.  You click on an interface on the left to show the drop down options and in those options are an opportunity to view graphs for inbound/outbound traffic, for errors and discards, along with an option to administratively shut down the port at the bottom of the list.  When you make a selection from this list to look at bandwidth reports it builds a graph on the right-hand side, giving you options for today, this week, last thirty days, etc, and it is this graph that the question refers too.


               I'll go downstairs and see if I can find the info on which build of SW it is.  I'm sorry but I am not familiar with Orion IF or NTA, so it is entirely possible that I posted this question in the wrong category or forum.  I'm sure my network admin could give me some kind of answer, but he's out today and I wanna close this sale!  So I'm trying to get the prospect's question answered so I can sign him up!


               Thanks!  I'll look for more info.

                • Re: Customer question - continuous throughput verses bursting
                  Andy McBride

                  OK - those are Orion views. I'll get with the Orion PM so that I don't tell any lies here.


                  ;)


                  Andy

                      • Re: Customer question - continuous throughput verses bursting

                        Andy, any word on this yet?  Thanks!

                          • Re: Customer question - continuous throughput verses bursting
                            Andy McBride

                            Can you post a screen shot of the view? If so I can answer right away.

                              • Re: Customer question - continuous throughput verses bursting

                                First of all thank you both so much for your consideration of my dilemma.  For the record I was able to sign the prospect to a colocation contract lacking this specific description, which is good, he installs Monday.


                                 I think my network admin would be horrified if he knew that I was out in the world asking amateur questions such as this.  I know he would hate for anyone to think that we don't know enough about what we are doing, because he most certainly does.  I on the other hand have a long, long way to go.


                                 Anyway I still pursue this issue because it would be helpful for me to have a better general understanding.  I realize now that the answer is actually in the amount of data on the pipe compared with the time frame involved.  My new understanding is that "continuous throughput" is an average, and "bursting" is peak values.  It's relatively simple, and embarrassing for me to admit that I could not see the forest for the trees.


                                 So...I asked basically "how long does a burst have to last before it is considered continous throughput?"  It's a stupid question.  It's not how long the burst is, but how you define the time frame that you are measuring.  If you use a time frame that is identical to the burst, then that peak value would be the actual continuous throughput figure as well.  If you use thirty days, then continuous throughput would be an average of the traffic over thirty days, from the start point and end point you filter for.


                                In colocation sales, once in a while you'll get a guy who engages you in a duel of words in order to make a point that justifies discounted pricing.  Normally I have a pretty good understanding of things, enough to present logical facts, but this particular guy was making sport of twisting words in the conversation.  In the actual conversations with this prospect one of the analogies he presented to me was "how cold is cold?"  You can imagine how this thinking might apply to bandwidth costs.  Another thing he said was "if you are giving me one meg burstable to ten, then you can make that two megs burstable to ten."  He refused to acknowledge that he was responsible for buying enough pipe to ensure his performance, or maybe he was not understanding that the bursting is best effort. 


                                Either way it's another day on the front lines in sales.  I encounter lots of IT professionals, I learn so much from our customers, and situations such as the experience I've had with this customer are rare really.  Still I brought him in here, and I'll work hard to help him grow his business.  One day he and I will be talking about where to put his next cage, laughing at the tiny colocation deal we started with.


                                Thanks again guys, you're the best!