16 Replies Latest reply on Jul 10, 2008 5:21 AM by Krislee

    NPM 8.2 database  - nightly maintenance question

      Morning,

      Our NPM database can take an age to run it's 'nightly' maintenance.  It's usually about 28 hours but can sometimes be two and a half days!

      Anyone got any ideas why? It seems ludicrous.  How can this be brought down to nightly?

      Database size can vary between 800MB and 1.5GB.  PC spec is Pentium D 2.8Ghz (P4 Dual Core), 2GB RAM and 280GB SATA disk.
       

      Regards,

      Kris. 

        • Re: NPM 8.2 database  - nightly maintenance question
          mark wiggans

          This behavior might be caused by a full or corrupt DB. Have you attempted a compact and repair using Access? Generally the closer to the 2GB limit you are the longer the nightly maintenance will take to run through all the records. You might even have a corrupt DB which is not allowing the DB Maintenance to perform correctly. Here are the detailed steps for using the compact and repair within Access. http://support.solarwinds.com/kbase/ProblemDetail.cfm?ID=128

          You might consider adjusting your data retention settings and limit the amount of nodes you monitor to stem some of the DB growth. Also, many improvements have been made since 8.2, so I would also suggest upgrading if possible.


           

            • Re: NPM 8.2 database  - nightly maintenance question

              Thanks Mark.

              'Repair and compaction' is run regularly from within Solarwinds but I tried the first two methods using Access which are shown in the link you've given (the third was to delete the database and start again which I don't want to do).  It has made no difference I'm afraid.  The file size at the start was about 1.2GB (which had just had the Solarwinds Compaction tool run on it), after the Access tools it was still about 1.2GB.

              The nightly maintenance was run again and it took 66 hours to complete.  After compacting it again it dropper down to 850MB.


              Any other ideas?

              Cheers,

               

              Kris.