1 Reply Latest reply on Sep 14, 2007 2:22 PM by bleearg13

    Tags:  Cool stuff to use with your ipMonitor installation?

      If you are not already using Tags in your ipMonitor installation, you may want to consider using them.  Here is some information on the Tags: The tags are usually used to pass information relevant to the Monitor or to the Alert the tag is associated with. For example, with Monitors, you could create a Tag called "Info" and have the value for the tab to contain valuable information for the Monitor;

      “If this Monitor fails; call John (xxx) xxx-xxxx, he is currently administrating the system.”

      Or the value could be:

      “This routing device is located in building two, second floor, rack 9, shelve 4.”

      Now that the Monitor has a tag called Info associated with it, this information can be passed on within an Alert by adding the following token to the body of the Alert:

      %monitortag[Info]%

      The following tips from our Support portal should prove useful:

      - Using Custom Tags to Store Emergency Information

      https://support.ipmonitor.com/tips/c338adcceb8d45cbae367091c91186eb.aspx

      - Using Custom Tag Color to Indicate Important Information

      https://support.ipmonitor.com/tips/b5a289adf9764bc589c5c86d650e8ed2.aspx

      - Using Quick Filters to Search Based on Custom Tags

      https://support.ipmonitor.com/tips/35814b6a64b64800bb371d50a31bd2d4.aspx

      Cheers,

      Stephane

        • Re: Tags:  Cool stuff to use with your ipMonitor installation?
          bleearg13

          Tags are great enhancements to monitors.  For those in the Orion world, they are similar to Custom Properties.  At one time, we were working with a now defunct software developer to create a 'triage' troubleshooting system, whereby the system processes emails received from ipMonitor, checks the tags, and performs basic troubleshooting prior to opening up a trouble ticket for a human to look at.  Through the use of tags, we attempted to pass information such as the router to SSH into, the interface to do 'show int' on, and the IP to ping. The system was supposed to perform these very basic components of first-line-of-defense troubleshooting and open a ticket so techs didn't have to do it all themselves.

          Unfortunately, the software developer never delivered what they promised.  :-(  Maybe someone else out there will see this and develop something similar to share with the community.