9 Replies Latest reply on Aug 7, 2017 11:44 AM by praveen v

    Top 10 Pros of SAM

    praveen v

      Can any now share the pros of cons of SAM with other monitoring tools

        • Re: Top 10 Pros of SAM
          praveen v

          Any Suggestions

          • Re: Top 10 Pros of SAM
            tigger2

            Off the top of my head, I can think of 5

             

            - Creating "new" templates with one or more component monitors is relatively easy.  Even if your component monitor is literally a script you have to create from scratch, it doesn't take too long to go from "I have written this script" to "and Now Orion is running it for me every X minutes and alerting/collecting data based on the output". Other tools can be significantly more difficult to create new/custom monitoring if you stray from the built-in modules/components/templates/wizards, especially if they have a large "framework" to work within. So the "pro" of this is that you can generally quickly build (and maintain) monitoring for in house or 3rd party applications where you don't have something you can just load in to the monitoring system from the vendor.. The "con" is that your script has to be written in a supported language, and that you're writing a script which can be work to maintain, esp. when the monitored application is upgraded and no one is there to tell you what you need to change...but this is going to be a "con" for any app.  SAM's simplicity/ease of use makes this pain smaller, IMHO.

             

            - Tied to the above note, since it's easier to write a SAM template for custom monitoring, it's more likely if you have no idea how to create monitoring for X, then someone will be able to help you (like someone on Thwack) or the custom template has already been created and shared on Thwack. Other tools have their own forums and their own repositories (or they are spread out across many blogs maintained by individuals) but the simplicity of creating a SAM template means others will look at helping you (or just creating one and uploading it to Thwack) as much less of a time consuming chore.  The larger and more complex the framework the less time anyone will devote to helping you create some thing custom (until it's so complex you're stuck trying to pay a contractor or vendor to do it for you). Pro: Community support can be leveraged more as a result of a simpler framework to develop in.

             

            - The SAM/NPM/etc "dashboards" in the web UI are very much appreciated by myself and the people I support as "easy to look at, build, and use" vs. other tools, which typically seem to have to have many clicks to get information, and also seem to look at "dashboards" as something you have to build on top of the data collection.  SAM (and NPM) make it so it is easy to add a SAM template with monitoring and very quickly see charts/graphs/stats of the data out-of-the-box.  If you want to add or move things around after the fact you can, but I find it not something I need to do often.  Pro: Going from "I need to put something into SAM" to "it's in SAM and I/others can see the data" is very easy with little extra work to build separate views of the data.

             

            - This is going to be a weird one but..."less data collected".  In some tools, when something like IIS or Exchange, MS SQL is monitored (I'm choosing these on purpose as "perfect" examples as SAM has them as vendor provided, and many vendors also provide them ), the monitoring goes very deep.  like hundreds of metrics, and drill downs, etc.  The result of this is there's a LOT of data to sift through and understand not only what the data means, but how to get to it and consume it.  In SAM, specifically IIS, MS SQL and Exchange, there are about 50 metrics each.  This means less data is collected, but its much easier to digest.  You could add more metrics if you wanted, but the built in ones are generally the top metrics teh admins of the apps need to know about.  Pro: probably only the monitoring you need gets put into SAM, so there's less to manage and to understand/digest.  Con: If you need more metrics it's work to add it, but...pro: it's the monitoring you specifically want/need.

             

            - As an add on to the above "less data collected", this also means "less work to tune/maintain" the monitoring and alerting.  When you have only 50 metrics for an app, then you can sit down and tun it by looking at past data or in a room with application support ( for defining base alerting thresholds, etc.).  .When there's hundreds of metrics, it's much harder to get anyone to look at all of it, and tuning is usually done piecemeal or "as needed" or "these X metrics need to be tuned immediately" blog posts or vendor best practices.

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              • Re: Top 10 Pros of SAM
                tigger2

                ha, one more: SAM, for what it provides IF you use it, is relatively cheap compared to other solutions.  I don't know of any SAM templates that need to be purchased.  For other vendors, *some* app monitoring may be free out of the box (and anything custom is usually free that I'm aware of) but there are modules/plug-ins/packs/packages/integrations whatever you call them that are only sold by 3rd party vendors that don't come cheap, and then you have to manage licensing for the separate app monitoring. I've worked with other apps that charged licenses to monitor each individual MS SQL/Oracle/etc. database, or 3rd parties charged to monitor individual components of their app, and they sold each app monitoring component separately.  Not like "$10 per license one-time purchase" but like "$5-10,000 purchase of 3rd party app monitoring plug-in/package/integration, + $x per new license as you add more app monitoring, + $y maintenance per year".  So Pro: generally cheap if other solutions rely on charging you on what apps/components you want to monitor.

                  • Re: Top 10 Pros of SAM
                    orioncrack

                    Highly disagreed on cheap.

                     

                    For the $6000 we spent on SAM we are able to monitor 5 SQL servers.

                     

                    And, the $17,000 for an additional polling engine is extreme.

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                      • Re: Top 10 Pros of SAM
                        tigger2

                        I have set up more than that in the past so, if it helps any to have a point of reference:

                        Using the AppInsight for SQL template I had 20+? database instances, with hundreds? of databases inside the instances. On top of maybe 30-40 custom monitoring templates (average 2-4 components in each...not a lot per template but set up on multiple servers so maybe a couple of hundred component monitors pulling data every 5-10 minutes each) but I have no idea how many components/connections are actually being used for just SAM.  My SAM poller is reporting just 5% usage (the SQL instances have been removed though ).

                         

                        Anyway, I didn't notice I was putting on a huge load with SAM when SQL was in as we use NPM a *lot* more and SAM as an add on for specifically requested/as-needed app monitoring, mostly text logs, event logs, and windows services. but I have in the past seen it handle more on my single server system (so I'm not paying for additional polling engines today).  I've got 16 procs, 72 GB memory (waay too much, I have a re-used server) on the app server and the DB on a separate server so that may have something to do with it (app server memory usage is ~ 20% used, CPU avg 40%, with spikes to 100% occasionally)?

                         

                        I agree on 17k for a polling engine to be way too high, which is why I'll probably never be able to get an additional one

                        • Re: Top 10 Pros of SAM
                          praveen v

                          There is any unlimited licence ?