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Level 10

Given the availability of cloud options for personal storage, how much storage do you carry?

There are options everywhere to put your data in the cloud, from Amazon S3 to Dropbox to SkyDrive (among others) and many of these services offer some amount of space at no cost.  Coupled with new user specials or “if you have this device” deals, which offer more free space, there is no shortage of online capacity to park information.  Not only does this allow you to access your 2013 Christmas list or idea list from anywhere there is Internet, but the information is replicated to the moon and back to ensure responsive availability.

My question to you is a two part question, first, which if any online storage providers do you use for your personal needs?  And second, and most important, do you still carry or maintain a certain amount of storage locally, be it in flash drives, external hard disks, NAS solutions or any other form that is not cloud based?

I tend to do both... I have a myriad of portable hard disks (each with a certain purpose in mind) and flash drives for portability, a small storage array at home to ensure the Adobe LightRoom photo galleries and documents are stored off of my computer, and a few cloud accounts just in case something needs to be available when I am on someone else’s computer.

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28 Replies
Level 8

I have 100 Gbs of Dropbox storage and usually carry my 8 Gb flash drive for dropping programs such as vpn client on machines that I need access from.

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Level 7

It's funny, when you start thinking about it, you realize you have stuff all over the place! Dropbox, Amazon, photo backup to Google+, icloud.  Locally, I have a 1 TB external drive.  Oh, and about 50 thumb drives

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I my tunes are in Google Music in the cloud... If I have to carry a lot of data I use portable hard disks either slimline laptop type or even full size drives in enclosures.  Generally I don't carry any but in my phone.

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I really have no strategy when it comes to storage...  Dropbox and iCloud lead the cloud storage fight.  I also have keyfobs to store most used "TECHTools"...  You never know when you are goiing to be helping someone who is off-grid...

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Level 11

Cloud storage I use my skydrive @ 25GB of storage, local storage I am probably around 1 TB betwwen home and work portable storage. I do now thing about mobility in the "cloud" so if I do need to transfer to to the cloud I usually make whatever device i am storing to a VHD or vmdk depending on what I am working with.

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Level 7

I don't carry any portable disks or flash drives but I do have an assortment of cloud storage. Most of it is in Dropbox which includes both personal and business related data. Some of it is over Amazon S3 as well. But the tricky and the best part of my data is that I use GroupDocs to organize my files and folders. It provides storage as well and has standard and individual pricing plan and I can access my Dropbox and Amazon data directly through it. It is easily manageable for me this way.

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Level 10

Between Dropbox and Skydrive - about 500Gbs...

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Level 10

I use the free version of dropbox.  I also use the netgear clould backup solution to backup my NAS.  I keep a 64GB thumb drive on me at all times with basic portable apps I need like putty, and finally I have a 1TB 2.5" portable harddrive in my bag in case I need ISOs or other larger files.

--Dave

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Level 9

I have a portable USB 500 GB hard drive. But after reading these replies that seems inadequate and limiting.

Thanks for the thought provoking discussion.

Sure, everyone knows about cloud-based storage for enterprise use. But I hadn't given it much thought for my private data. Time to go think about cloud-based storage, double copies and treating my personal data more like corporate assets.

-chris

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I carry a 64 GB USB Drive,

Skydrive, Google Drive, and Box.com somewhere around 50 GB total ,

and a laptop with 500GB HDD when i have to be in the world.  

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I carry a portable USB 120 GB hard drive, and have a drop box of about 100 GB or so give or take a few GB from sending out referrals for free space when they first started..  The only thing I don't like about the cloud is exactly what it is.. It's a cloud where you place "your" stuff on someone else's hardware/network.  This makes it prone to their network configurations and hardware failures, or exploits from hacking groups that target these big companies.

I don't mind putting programs to share, or work tools, documents that aren't sensitive, but at this point I won't come close to placing my personal files, pictures, videos on a cloud.. I like the control of my own Storage locally, and backed up by my standards. 

I have my Desktop with a 256 GB SSD for OS and Critical Apps, and a 4 TB storage array for all my music and movies and games. 

This all backs up to my home NAS which is about 8 TB atm.

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Google Drive for most of my personal stuff, big and small.

I carry around two or three 32GB USB drives just for convenience's sake, but I rarely use them.

I sync music and stuff to Google Music as well, so that's a nice thing in case my home box bricks.

Once a month or so, I also dupe my stuff to a 2TB external drive.

And no, you don't control the cloud. As far as 'trusting' it, I adopt a 'trust but verify and back up somewhere else' methodology with good success.

If certain industries aren't allowing the cloud, they eventually will. The technology and software continues to improve and mature. I think it's also important to differentiate between the consumer-level and corporate SLA-based clouds.

Of course, that doesn't help those people and businesses who get tanked every time EC2 decides to take a bath or gets derailed by a careless developer.

My 2c.

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Level 11

I have no real strategy.  I make use of Google Drive mainly as a storage place for things I do via Gmail.  I have a couple of other basic accounts (Skydrive, Dropbox...), but I don't utilize them for much. 

I tend to carry an assortment of flash drives (8-32GB) and a couple of hard drives mainly just to get stuff from on place to another.  All of my family's data is backed up onto hard drives that are only powered on to do backups.

I definitely see the advantage of using online sources for backup especially thinking about how quickly a disaster could render all of my personal storage useless. 

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Level 10

Wow.. I am not sure why this surprises me. I guess I thought I was in the minority still carrying a hefty amount of storage around.  (2+ TB in the bag at this time).  Do you think that we are this way because that is just where our stuff lives and why move it?  Or because the cloud is still a bit ominous? Or simply because there is not Internet access everywhere yet?

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You don't control the cloud... you can't by default trust the cloud... simple as that.  If you work in certain industries it flat out isn't allowed... in this case the solution is we are building our own clouds ie. vCloud Director 5.x or something similar.

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I believe it's just a matter of personal preference.  The entire reason most of us are on these forums is we work with monitoring of computer systems.  We know for a fact that there are two types of systems those that have failed and those that will....I expect everything to break at some point and I have enough 1am phone calls to prove it.

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I understand the desire to reduce late night phone calls for sure, I guess I just figured more and more IT professionals would be quick to jump to the cloud for their day to day stuff storage.  As long as the Internet is available, that works wonders, but going without Internet access when all your stuff lives online is a bit tough

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You basically nailed it, Derek.

IF(and thats a big if) Internet access was cheap(er?) or 100% available I do believe that Cloud Storage would replace physical devices. As long as there is some overprice to access Internet or low availability in remote regions, we'll always have some device(s) with us full time.

We know that the cloud is reliable, redundancy here and there, but something like a DNS problem(remember GoDaddy) will prevent us from accessing our data.

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That's definitely true.  DNS seems to be the web's great equalizer and one little hiccup can put a wrench in some of the best laid plans.  However I have no desire to memorize the lovely new IP6 addresses.  I will count myself lucky if I ever get one of those down.  IP4 was more than enough memorization for me... for owned IPs and such.

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Level 12

Personally ... I use CrashPlan for backup/cloud storage. I also rely on iTunes to store my music and video, Amazon to store my books and video, and DropBox for items that I usually would've stored on a thumbdrive (although CrashPlan is starting to replace DropBox because I have unlimited storeage with CrashPlan).

I still carry a 16GB thumbdrive everywhere I go and have multiple at home, however, the need for the physical media is quickly disappearing.  I'm not sure that I will ever feel comfortable enough to take the thunbdrive off my keychain, but .... maybe someday.  🙂

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