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THWACK Monthly Mission - February 2020

Community Manager
_THWACK rotator – 900x300 no CTA.png

Did you make a New Year’s resolution in January? Are you still sticking to it? If you are—bravo! We salute you, resolution-keeper. For those of you who are feeling your resolutions fade as February dawns, we hear you. January was such a simpler time. But take heed. Don’t let your security resolutions follow in your clean-eating footsteps. Keep up with your cybercise routine.

Using Security Event Manager, Patch Manager, Identity Monitor, Network Configuration Manager, Server Configuration Manager, and Access Rights Manager, you too can join the ranks of the resolution-keepers while simultaneously protecting and securing your environment. Cybercise—the craze sweeping the nation—don’t miss out on your opportunity to live your best life in 2020.

Start your mission.



FEBRUARY MISSION

Use the mission’s resources to complete the tasks and answer the questions for a chance to win!

Correctly answer each question during the week and you'll be entered for a chance to win the weekly prize.

Correctly answer all 10 questions over the course of the month and you'll be entered for a chance to win the grand prize.

150 points are being awarded for each correctly answered question. There are 10 questions, which means you can earn a maximum of 1,500 points for this mission.

Want to join the mission, but not a member? Sign up FREE now!

PRIZES

Weekly Prizes & Drawing Dates:
February 10, 2020:  18oz Hydro Flask

February 17, 2020:  Rice Cooker and Food Steamer


Grand Prize:
February 17, 2020:  6 Month Subscription Medium Urthbox



MISSION RULES

A new question will open every day (Monday - Friday) starting on February 3, 2020. Once a question has opened, it will remain open until February 16, 2020 at 11:59 p.m. CT. Check the schedule below for exact open/close times.



MISSION SHORTCUT

Complete the mission shortcut between February 3, 2020 and February 16, 2020 to be entered to win Apple Airpods!

SolarWinds Access Rights Manager (ARM) enables IT and security admins to centrally provision, deprovision, manage, and audit user access rights to systems, data, and files while protecting their organizations from security breaches and complying with regulatory requirements

Shortcut Steps:

    1. Download a free trial of ARM

    2. Follow the steps here to install ARM

    3. Submit a screenshot of the rich client start page

DOWNLOAD FREE TRIAL  SUBMIT SCREENSHOT

WEEKLY PRIZESMONTUEWEDTHUFRIWINNERS
Week 1: Complete questions 1-5 by February 10, 2020 to be entered to win: 18oz Hydro Flask
Week 2: Complete questions 6-10 by February 17, 2020 to be entered to win: Rice Cooker and Food Steamer

Correctly answer all 10 questions by February 16, 2020 and get entered to win the Grand Prize! 6 Month Subscription Medium Urthbox



February Mission Terms & Conditions: US, UK, and Canada | Germany | Australia

February Mission Shortcut Terms & Conditions: US, UK, and Canada | Germany | Australia

98 Comments
MVP
MVP

New month, New mission

Level 20

Security yes more security related stuff please!

Level 12

Looking forward to this one. I know we can't be secure enough.

MVP
MVP

Mission away....hang on for a fun ride!

Level 13

Woo hoo.  New mission!  It's my favorite thing.

Level 12

I always look forward to the new missions.  Thanks for taking time to put these together!

MVP
MVP

Wow! Easiest question ever!!!! Surely only the bacon lovers will get this wrong?!

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Level 12

What? You mean that A. is not the correct answer?!  Glad I read that before I answered it

Level 8

What do we want? BACON! BACON! BACON!

When do we want it? NOW! BACON! BACON! BACON!.

Level 8

download.jfif

I almost clicked the bacon answer!

MVP
MVP

Obviously a bacon trap....

Level 12

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If this was a SQL monitoring mission I would think that sqlrockstar​ was involved.

Paul

Myself, I prefer the KCI (Keyboard-Chair Interface) acronym to PEBKAC (Problem Exists Between Keyboard And Chair). Due to it's three-letter length it's much easier to get in under the radar:

i.e. "We believe the fault to be due to a KCI error with the script"

Anyone have any other examples?

Level 10

I LOVED today's question. Thank you!

Level 13

The ID 10 T one is often appropriate, but that can backfire once they figure it out obviously.  We used to like IWITS (it worked in the shop) or IWFM (it works for me) back in the day.

Level 13

Hard to pass on that bacon answer.  Had to wrestle the mouse cursor away.

Level 9

I had heard the other acronyms mentioned before but a coworker showed me this one recently that I hadn't.

PICNIC = problem in chair not in computer

Level 13

Tight on time these days, but will try to complete this month's mission.

Level 10

I'm totally going to use that from now on.  When my boss asks me how a support visit went, I'll just say, "No worries.  [He\She] was a picnic to deal with." 

Level 13

I especially like that PICNIC has other meanings, and is not well known to be an insult to the computer user. Many people know about PEBKAC and ID10T, so if they (or someone) over hears one talking about a customer with those terms, they may get uppity about this or that. And -- what if a customer walks away, I give it a few moments so he is far enough away that he can't hear me berate him to my coworker... but the customer has another question, and comes back, just in time to overhear me say to the coworker about an ID10T issue... well, I may have given offense to the bumbling moron.

But if he hears about a "Picnic issue" -- no offense is taken.

Level 10

Yes, and if that bumbling moron is the CEO...you are SG&T. (Screwed, Glued, & Tattooed)

Woo! first week, where I haven't managed to miss-read a question when answering!

Level 12

Taylor Pork Roll, New Jersey's favorite native pork product, is far superior to mere bacon.

Level 7

yumdarling​ Is there intended to be a date discrepancy between finishing week two and finishing the entire mission?

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Level 7

Nice. I love new missions

MVP
MVP

This is always my favourite question to answer. I can't possibly get it wrong

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That one left me in stitches, generally thought I got duped for a moment

Level 14

Week 2 Q1.  Thought it was obvious until just before the 15 min mark when he mentions two groups of people that makes the question tricky.  Are they looking for the obvious one(s) mentioned or are the looking for the two throwaway ones added right at the end.

Level 11

How is "all of the above" NOT correct for today? Everyone can exfiltrate data or bring in something bad at some level. Just because the Webinar says it doesn't make it true.

Level 8

ah but if 'all of the above' includes 'none of the above' that is an oxymoron and can't be true

MVP
MVP

The question did say explicitly call out....

During that period he goes on about admins and about to leave employees in a special AD group. (how do you generate such a group as you are lucky to get 2 weeks notice and some companies immediately walk them?)

Then later he mentions 3 groups.  So there is some ambiguity in place here.

Just my observation...waiting a bit before I answer,

Level 9

I agree, this question kind of made me mad because of the terminology used. He calls out a USER named "administrator", but then specifies a GROUP called "about to the leave the company" or whatever the verbiage was ... very misleading, and I agree that ANYONE can exfiltrate data, he keyed in on a USE CASE SCENARIO and not a generalized statement about potential ... very poor choice of wording and examples in today's question, in my personal opinion.

Level 9

haha I had the exact same thought when I looked at first... they could move "none" below "all" to rectify this I guess

MVP
MVP

The question asked what he called out, not what was possible - and in the video he pretty specifically called out several sets of people

Level 20

Yeah I got burned on this one... hard to guess what the answer was supposed to be.

Level 11

I'd rather have correct information than a green check for properly selecting incorrect information.

Level 8

It said "explicitly called out in the video" I also got the question wrong (for a different reason) so I don't think it was worded particularly well either, but that's the reason for your X.

Level 12

The Feb 10th question was a practice in active listening.

Level 12

Didn't listen long enough and got it wrong. 

Level 9

Today's question is stupid!

Should say pick 3.

MVP
MVP

Calling out vs. mentioning in a passing comment are 2 different things.

I guess it is a perspective (point of view) of the person asking the question versus what the other party might interpret by not having the same perspective.

s0c4 - protection exception....unable to address memory outside of your address space.  Mainframers will understand this one.

Level 10

Stick to what he names, and you are good to go.

Level 9

The hint for question 7/Feb 11 should be the following:

Introducing SolarWinds Identity Monitor

It's currently "Access Rights Manager 2019.4 Release Notes."

Level 10

I think it was changed, because it refers to the document in your link now. Thanks for sharing.

MVP
MVP

I take exception to what is stated at the beginning of todays question:

"Sometimes, the weakest security link is your users. If one of them is using a simple password on one of their corporate accounts, those credentials can easily end up as part of a data breach. If a bad actor gets their hands on those credentials, they can be used to get into your environment undetected - and havoc can ensue"

In this case a simple password doesn't matter..  If the credentials end up as part of a data breach even the most complex password could be exposed and yes havoc can ensue.

Level 10

Isn't the writer trying to say that it's usually simple passwords that are a root cause of data breaches?  That's what I feel always gets preached.

Level 12

If the passwords are encrypted in a data breach then weak passwords are cracked faster than strong passwords. For example, the results of a quick google search showed that a seven character password can be cracked in .29 milliseconds while a 12 character password takes two centuries. Of course that all could change with quantum computing as sqlrockstar​ pointed out in one of his Actuator posts.

Level 10

The following is literally my favorite way of seeing password strength explained: https://xkcd.com/936/

Whouda thought if you put four random words together, you'd get a stronger entropy that makes it difficult to break?

I always wondered why Comcast put such funky words together as a password on their routers.  Now I know why.