World Backup Day 2020: Breaking Out of Backup Traps and Being a Recovery Hero

That special day of the year is almost here—the one when we remind you (and the world) how important it is to keep up with your backup strategy and make sure it’s up to speed and effective (yay!). 

 

We all know the heartbreaking feeling of losing valuable data and information (and sometimes it hurts more than a breakup). Backing up your data is critical to your business, but a backup can also quickly get complicated. Hardware failures, cyberattacks, natural disasters, and human error are just a couple of things that can get in your way when trying to keep up. 

 

In honor of World Backup Day (March 31), we want to hear about your backup headaches and success stories—tell us about those moments of slow data transfers and hardware breaks, and times when a successful backup was a hero in a recovery situation. 

 

We know you’re as excited as we are to celebrate and emphasize the importance of a backup strategy, so share your thoughts by March 11 and we’ll put 250 THWACK points in your account!

Anonymous
  • In the early 90s, I was a CNE working for a fortune 500 company in silicon valley. We'd recently taken over the support contract and hadn't fully explored/comprehended the scope of the infrastructure yet. The company relied on cc:Mail and one of the Gateway/Router systems failed causing a frantic call for action because business processes were interrupted.

    It was one of those situations where I didn't know what I didn't know. But, the system had to be returned to service quickly. I poked around the computer and noticed that the disk was reported "missing" during POST and it seemed that a rebuild (no backups or documentation available) was imminent. In desperation I removed the hard drive and gave it a good shaking, installed it, and crossed my fingers. The computer "saw" the disk during start-up and mail began to flow again.

    Now I think more about business processes and how service interruptions should be evaluated for their impact and mitigated. Can the business pause while the staff scrambles to react? Is a backup/restore the only option for a system? Maybe the application/system support staff has some insights in how a recovery can meet RPO/RTO? I'm sure I'm opening some old wounds for people on this thread and not really pitching in a lighthearted backup/restore story.

    But I think backups are a useful tool and it should be one resource in the SYSADMIN tool kit. Backup wise, it's all fun and games until a restore is needed.

  • It worries me how people still are not backing up the cloud services like OneDrive and other O365 items like email.   I am also surprise more companies stick with the cheapest solution when they want to protect their most valuable asset, their data.  Backups are required for everything, and because you have never had an issue, doesn't mean you won't.  The way most management perceives backups is appalling.  

    I celebrate a day which reminds us all to backup by testing my backups.    Taking Commvault, veeam and Nakivo, and put them to the test.   No I do not trust a single solution.   You test backups by how well you can recover.  So we test recovery, look at the speed of the recovery and accuracy.   Ah, what fun it is.  

  • If backup solutions are extremely time consuming and a chore to do. you're not doing it right..

    Ideally backups should only be used in case of an emergency, however sometimes due to user error, someone will accidentally delete an important document or something that is crucial. Telling the customer that he should be more careful, but we're not backing up the data because it would take too long seems kind of unacceptable... If recovering data is an issue, it's not the customers fault... it's just exposing a problem with the existing recovery solution.

    no real story or morale.. just kind of venting, since I've seen system admins taking an unsympathetic attitude towards the users..

  • I guess I was a little off topic.. the burn is still really fresh!!

    Your backups are only as good as your last restore!