Is MS SQL 2008 R2 SP3 supported with DPA 2021.1 as a monitored instance?

I see it in the Online Demo but according to former release notes it is not supported. (In 2020.2 Release notes - DPA can no longer be used to monitor SQL Server 2008 R2 database instances.)

Is this some demo trickery? This is the main reason we have not upgraded past v2019.4.

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  • Sorry for the confusion with the demo.

    Per policy, once the DB vendor (i.e., in this case Microsoft) no longer provides either support or extended support for a DB version, DPA typically will…

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  • Sorry for the confusion with the demo.

    Per policy, once the DB vendor (i.e., in this case Microsoft) no longer provides either support or extended support for a DB version, DPA typically will stop official support of that version of the DB as well.

    However, a DPA release no longer fully supporting a DB version does NOT necessarily mean DPA can no longer successfully analyze that DB version. 

    Historically, many of our customers have successfully used DPA to analyze most database versions long after they are no longer officially supported. MS SQL Server 2008 R2 is such a case. In all releases subsequent to DPA 2019.4 that no longer have full support for MSSS 2008, including the most recent GA version 2021.1.889 (as of the writing of this response), we have numerous customers successfully monitoring hundreds of instances of MSSS 2008 and 2008 R2 SP3.

    The DPA R&D team has historically and intends to continue taking great care where possible to avoid making changes in DPA  code that might negatively impact older, unsupported DB versions. The team evaluates the type of updates needed, the complexity incurred to maintain backward compatibility, the severity of impact, the overhead of testing and other factors. Unfortunately, guaranteeing backward compatibility of all functionality for all older, unsupported DB versions is not always feasible or practical.

    Dropping official support for a DB version does mean that:

    • QA Testing of future DPA releases may no longer run or only run a reduced set of regression tests against that DB version
    • New features, metrics, or alerts in future DPA  releases may not work for that DB version
    • If problems develop over time with existing features, metrics, or alerts that are specific to unsupported DB versions, DPA will use its discretion in deciding when and whether to release workarounds or fixes. 

    The customer must choose whether they want to monitor older versions of databases with newer versions of DPA that no longer officially support it. My suggestion is to create a test version of a new DPA release to register and monitor those older DB instances and let it run a while to see if you are successful.  Compare DPA's analysis information for the DB instance in question between the production and the test DPA versions in order to make your decision to either:

    1. Upgrade the release of the production DPA and continue monitoring all the same DB instances as before
    2. Migrate all supported database versions to the new test DPA server and maintain the original DPA server and its older release to monitor the MSSS 2008 instances.
Reply
  • Sorry for the confusion with the demo.

    Per policy, once the DB vendor (i.e., in this case Microsoft) no longer provides either support or extended support for a DB version, DPA typically will stop official support of that version of the DB as well.

    However, a DPA release no longer fully supporting a DB version does NOT necessarily mean DPA can no longer successfully analyze that DB version. 

    Historically, many of our customers have successfully used DPA to analyze most database versions long after they are no longer officially supported. MS SQL Server 2008 R2 is such a case. In all releases subsequent to DPA 2019.4 that no longer have full support for MSSS 2008, including the most recent GA version 2021.1.889 (as of the writing of this response), we have numerous customers successfully monitoring hundreds of instances of MSSS 2008 and 2008 R2 SP3.

    The DPA R&D team has historically and intends to continue taking great care where possible to avoid making changes in DPA  code that might negatively impact older, unsupported DB versions. The team evaluates the type of updates needed, the complexity incurred to maintain backward compatibility, the severity of impact, the overhead of testing and other factors. Unfortunately, guaranteeing backward compatibility of all functionality for all older, unsupported DB versions is not always feasible or practical.

    Dropping official support for a DB version does mean that:

    • QA Testing of future DPA releases may no longer run or only run a reduced set of regression tests against that DB version
    • New features, metrics, or alerts in future DPA  releases may not work for that DB version
    • If problems develop over time with existing features, metrics, or alerts that are specific to unsupported DB versions, DPA will use its discretion in deciding when and whether to release workarounds or fixes. 

    The customer must choose whether they want to monitor older versions of databases with newer versions of DPA that no longer officially support it. My suggestion is to create a test version of a new DPA release to register and monitor those older DB instances and let it run a while to see if you are successful.  Compare DPA's analysis information for the DB instance in question between the production and the test DPA versions in order to make your decision to either:

    1. Upgrade the release of the production DPA and continue monitoring all the same DB instances as before
    2. Migrate all supported database versions to the new test DPA server and maintain the original DPA server and its older release to monitor the MSSS 2008 instances.
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