In our latest release of NetFlow Traffic Analyzer (NTA), we’re focusing on features that deliver expanded visibility, and flexible evaluation and deployment options. For the first time, NTA is providing a significant contribution to our Network Insight™ feature for Palo Alto firewalls.

 

Also, in this release, we’re adding support for IPv6 flow records, and enhancing our filtering to display IPv4 only, IPv6, or both types of traffic.

 

For evaluation customers—and for current customers upgrading—we’ll automatically configure a local source of NetFlow data on the local server. This will provide an immediate source of data for evaluation installations and a comprehensive source of information for traffic sourced or destined to the primary poller.

 

Finally, we’re fully supporting the deployment of NTA into Azure, using the native Azure SQL Database service to host the flow database. This builds upon our existing support for deployment in AWS, using the native RDS service.

 

We’ll explain an important upcoming change in the upgrade process, and how to plan for it.

 

Traffic Visibility by Policy

 

In this release, NTA is contributing to our latest Network Insight through an integration with Network Configuration Manager (NCM). Users of SolarWinds NCM with Palo Alto firewalls will see top traffic conversations by security policy on the NCM Policy Details page. Examining traffic by policy helps answer the question, "Who might be affected as I make changes to my security policies?"

 

Let's look at how we find this view.  We'll start at the Node Details page for this firewall:

 

 

We'll use the slide-out menu in this view to select "Policies." This will take us to a list view of all the policies configured for zones on this device.

 

Selecting a policy from this list brings us to the Policy Details page:

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Policies define security controls between zones configured on the firewall. For a Palo Alto firewall, a zone can include one or more interfaces. So, in this view, we're looking at all the conversations based on applications defined in the policy.

 

It's a very different way of looking at conversations; this isn't a view of all traffic through a node or an interface. Rather, it's a view that relates to the policy definition, so the endpoints in these conversations are running over the applications on which your security rules are based.

 

The mechanism here is filtering; we’re looking at application traffic that references the application IDs in your security policy. So, the endpoints in those conversations may be from any zone where you’re using this policy.

 

For an administrator considering changes at the policy level, this is a valuable tool to understand how those rules apply immediately to production services and what kinds of impacts changes to them will have.

 

For this feature, you'll need both NCM and NTA. NTA, of course, requires Network Performance Monitor (NPM). NCM provides us the configuration information that includes the policy definition and the applications definitions. NTA reads application IDs from the flow records we receive from the Palo Alto firewall, and correlates those with the policy configuration to generate this view. With NTA, you can also easily navigate to more conventional node or interface views of the traffic traversing the firewall, and we integrate traffic information seamlessly into the Node Details page in NPM as well.

 

IPv6 Traffic Visibility

 

This release offers comprehensive visibility in mixed IPv4 and IPv6 environments, and the flexibility to isolate TopN views in each of these protocols. While deployment of IPv6 has not been aggressive as some originally predicted, it's gaining some significant traction in the public sector, large-scale distribution operations, universities, and companies working with IoT infrastructures. Our latest release consumes NetFlow v9 and IPFIX flow templates for IPv6 traffic and stores those records along with the IPv4 flow records we support today. Let's see what the NTA summary page looks like.

 

You'll notice some IPv6 conversations, and some IPv6 endpoints in the TopN views. This view gives you complete visibility into the traffic driving your utilization in a mixed IPv4 and IPv6 environment. We've also added new filters, both on the dashboard and in the flow navigator.

 

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These filters give you the flexibility to examine how traffic running over each version drives utilization, and which conversations are dependent on different configurations within the infrastructure.

 

The Orion® Platform—and NTA—already support installation on dual-stack IPv4 and IPv6 servers. You can receive these flow records on either an IPv4 or IPv6 interface, depending on how your server is connected.

 

IPv6 changes how we think about the security model. This visibility gives us a perspective on how our security polices act on IPv4 and IPv6 traffic to permit or deny conversations. In that sense, it's a valuable tool to confirm your traffic is compliant with your security policies.

 

Local Source of NetFlow

 

This release will automatically add a new source of NetFlow data to your NTA main poller. This new source is a composite of physical network interfaces on your Orion main poller represented as a special type of virtual interface: Local NetFlow Source. This new source of flow information gives you unprecedented visibility into the traffic that originates on or arrives to the Orion server. You can use this to answer questions about your network and system management traffic trends. "How much SNMP traffic does my monitoring generate? What volumes and frequencies of flow traffic do I receive, and from where? How much DNS traffic does my management platform drive, and to where?"

 

Let's see what this looks like.

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Selecting the "Local NetFlow Source" interface and drilling into it, here's the view.

 

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You can manage this source of traffic the same way you manage any other source of flow data: by selecting the "Manage Sources" link in the NetFlow Sources resource.

 

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You can enable or disable the Local NetFlow Source here to include or exclude traffic from this source.

 

For brand-new installations of NTA, this new source will be created and enabled by default. If you’re working with an evaluation copy of the NTA application, this will give you immediate live data in the product that's personal to your network. It's a great way to introduce your colleagues to new versions or evaluate new releases without having to reconfigure your network devices to send flow records to this instance.

 

If you’re upgrading NTA, this source will be created but will not be enabled by default. We'll respect your existing configuration and give you the flexibility to make the choice about whether you'd like to include this traffic in your current view. Disabling this source completely shuts down capture of traffic on the local interfaces.

 

Creating this interface consumes a single node license for both NPM and NTA. If you would prefer not to use a node license for local NetFlow source, you can completely delete this interface to release the license. You cannot, however, add this interface back later.

 

Azure Deployment

 

Finally, we've been working to ensure users deploying into Azure can make use of the native Azure SQL Database service for both the common Orion database and the SQL NTA database. You'll be able to specify Azure SQL Database to build both of these databases during installation, in much the same way as you build in existing SQL instances today. We're supporting additional choices to help lower operational costs and expand your deployment flexibility.

 

To take advantage of this option, you’ll enter the connection string for your Azure SQL Database instance much the same way you enter any other connection string in the Configuration Wizard.

 

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Changes in the Upgrade Process Are Coming

 

If you’re upgrading to NTA 4.6 from an older version of the product, you’ll once again see a familiar option to defer your NTA upgrade and remain on a version that doesn’t require SQL 2016 or later for the flow database.

 

In the past three releases of NTA (4.4, 4.5, and 4.6), we’ve included a pre-flight check in the upgrade dialog to allow customers to defer the upgrade and retain (or upgrade to) NTA version 4.2.3, the latest version that supports flow storage in the FastBit database. This in turn allowed updates to the Orion Core and other product modules without requiring an NTA upgrade. 

 

In the next release of NTA, this option will no longer be available. An upgrade to the next release of NTA after 4.6 will require a SQL 2016 or later database (or appropriate AWS RDS or Azure SQL option) to complete the upgrade.

 

A modern version of SQL supports columnstore technology, which provides significant performance and scale benefits for NTA. We’re building on this technology in every new release to drive better performance and a better user experience.

 

You should plan now for your next upgrade to deploy a SQL 2016 or later instance for flow storage. Refer to the NTA System Requirements documentation for supported options.

 

How Do I Get This Goodness?

 

For NTA, you can find the latest release in your Customer Portal. Remember, we also have a terrific complementary set of free NetFlow tools in the Flow Tool Bundle, including Flow Replicator, Flow Generator, and Flow Configurator.

 

To see all the features of Network Insight for Palo Alto, you’ll want to have several modules installed and working together.

 

  • Network Performance Monitor discovers and polls your Palo Alto firewall and retrieves and displays your site-to-site VPN and GlobalProtect client VPN connection information.
  • Network Configuration Manager collects your device configuration and provides a list of your security policies for zone-to-zone communication. This module tracks configuration changes over time and provides context for policies spanning multiple devices.
  • NetFlow Traffic Analyzer collects flow data from the firewall and maps the traffic to policies in the Policy Details page. You can also view traffic through the firewall or through specific interfaces.
  • User Device Tracker collects directly connected devices and provides a history of connections to the ports on the device.

 

You can demo these products individually or install/upgrade from any installer available in your Customer Portal.

 

Post your questions and experiences in theNetFlow Traffic Analyzer community forum!

It gives me great pleasure to introduce the newest version of Network Configuration Manager (NCM), v8.0, as generally available!

 

I’m pretty excited about this release, as it’s jam-packed full of great features. Per popular request, Network Insight includes awesome capabilities from NCM, Network Performance Monitor (NPM), NetFlow Traffic Analyzer (NTA), and User Device Tracker (UDT). This very special Network Insight for Palo Alto firewalls provides users with insights into their policies, traffic conversations across policies, and VPNs. We have a great detailed write-up about all the great value we stuffed into the feature here.

 

In addition to Network Insight, NCM is now easier to use when executing config change diffs, adds two new vendors to the Firmware Upgrade feature, and is more performant when executing config backups.

 

Updated Config Diff

 

In an effort to reduce the amount of time committed to spotting changes in a config diff (all those lines…), a simpler and easier-to-use Config Diff has been implemented in this version. By focusing the view around the context of the diff, the changes, you’ll now see the changes highlighted plus five lines above and below the changes. All unchanged lines beyond the five-line limit are collapsed to remove the endless scroll. This gives you the context of the change and makes it easier to discern what steps need to be taken next.

 

 

Additional Vendor Support for Firmware Upgrade

 

For some time now, you’ve all been asking for additional vendors to be added to Firmware Upgrade, and I’m pleased to say we’ve delivered. Take advantage of the automation to apply firmware to Juniper and Lenovo switches to patch vulnerabilities or ensure your network devices are on the latest. Have a different switch model? Just use the framework from the out-of-the-box templates to make it work for you.

 

 

Go check out the release notes for the full details or review the admin guide. We’ve been working hard to bring these wonderful new features to you, so be sure to visit your Customer Portal to download this version.

 

If there’s anything you think we should consider in a future release, please be sure to go create a new feature request to let me know about the additional functionality you would like to see.

We’re excited to introduce our Network Insight™ for Palo Alto firewalls! This is the fourth Network Insight feature, and we’re building these in direct response to your feedback about the most popularly deployed devices and the most common operational tasks you manage.

 

Network Insight features are designed to give you tools specific to the more complex and expensive special-purpose devices in your network infrastructure. While the bulk of your network consists of routing and switching devices, the more specialized equipment at the edge requires monitoring and visibility beyond the standard SNMP modeled metrics we’re all familiar with.

 

So, what kinds of visibility are we talking about for Palo Alto firewalls?

 

The Palo Alto firewall is zone-based, with security policies that describe the allowed or denied connectivity between zones. So, we’ll show you how we capture and present those security policies. We’ll show you how we can help you visualize application traffic conversations between zones, to help you understand how policy changes can affect your clients. Another critical feature of the Palo Alto firewall is to secure communications between sites, and to provide secure remote access to clients. We’ll show you how to see your site-to-site VPN tunnels, and to manage GlobalProtect client connections.

 

Managing Security Policies

 

Palo Alto firewalls live and die on the effectiveness of their security policies to control how they handle network traffic. Policies ensure business processes remain unaffected and perform optimally, but unintentional or poorly implemented policies can cause widespread network disruption. It’s critical for administrators to monitor not only the performance of the firewall, but the effect and accuracy of the policy configuration as well. As these policies are living entities, continually being modified and adjusted as network needs evolve, the impact and context of a change may be missed and difficult to recover. This is why in Network Insight for Palo Alto, Network Configuration Manager (NCM) brings some powerful features to overcome these pitfalls.

  • Comprehensive list view of security policies
  • Detailed view into each policy and its change history
  • Usage of a policy across other Palo Alto nodes managed by NCM
  • Policy configuration snippets
  • Interface configuration snippets
  • Information on applications, addresses, and services

 

Once the Palo Alto config is downloaded and parsed, the policy information will populate the Policies List View page. This page is intended to make it easier to search through and identify the right security policy from a potentially long list, using configurable filtering and searching. The list view provides each policy’s name, action, zones, and last change. Once the correct policy is identified, users can drill down into each one to see the composition and performance of each policy.

 

The policy details page summarizes the most critical information and simplifies the workflow to understand if a policy is configured and working as intended. You can review the basic policy details, as well as the policy configuration snippet and review the object groups composed into the policy. Admins will be able to quickly analyze if additional action is required to resolve an issue or optimize the given policy.

 

 

Some policies are meant to extend across multiple firewalls and without a view to see this, it’s easy to lose context about the effectiveness of your policy. Network insight for Palo Alto analyzes the configuration of each firewall to identify common security policies and display their status. As an administrator, this lets you confirm if your policies are being correctly applied across the network and to take action if they’re not. If there’s a desire to provide more continuous monitoring of a policy standard, you can also leverage a policy configuration snippet as a baseline for all Palo Alto nodes.

 

 

With any configuration monitoring and management, it’s critically important to be able to provide some proof of compliance for your firewall’s configuration. With Network Insight, you can track and see the history of changes to a policy and provide tangible evidence of events that have occurred. Of course, this also supports the ability to immediately run a diff of the configs where this change took place, by simply clicking the “View diff” button.

 

 

VPN Tunnel Monitoring, Finally

 

How do you monitor your VPN tunnels today? We asked you guys this question a lot as we started to design this feature. The most common response was you’d ping something on the other end of the tunnel. That approach has a number of challenges. The device terminating the VPN tunnel rarely has an IP address included in the VPN tunnel’s interesting traffic that you can ping. You have to ping something past the VPN tunnel device, usually some server. Sometimes the company at the other end of the tunnel intentionally has strict security and doesn’t allow ping. If they do allow ping, you have to ask them to tell you what to ping. If that thing goes down, monitoring says the tunnel is down, but the device might be down, not the tunnel. All this adds work. It’s all manual, and companies can have hundreds, thousands, or more VPN tunnels. Worst of all, it doesn’t work very well. It’s just up/down status. When a tunnel is down, why is it down? How do you troubleshoot it? When a tunnel is up, how much traffic is it using? When’s the last time it went well?

 

This is a tough position to be in. VPN tunnels may be virtual, but today they’re used constantly as infrastructure connections and may be more important than some of your physical WAN connections. They’re commonly used to connect branch offices to each other, to HQ, or to data centers. They’re the most popular way to connect one company to another, or from your company to an IaaS provider like Amazon AWS or Microsoft Azure. VPN tunnels are critical and deserve better monitoring.

 

Once you enable Network Insight for Palo Alto, Network Performance Monitor (NPM) will automatically and continually discover VPN tunnels. A site-to-site VPN subview provides details on every tunnel.

 

 

There are a couple things going on here that may not be immediately obvious but are interesting—at least for network nerds like me.

 

All tunnels display the source and destination IP. If the destination IP is on a device we’re monitoring, like another Palo Alto firewall or an ASA, we’ll link that IP to that node in NPM. That’s why 192.168.100.10 is a blue hyperlink in the screenshot. If you’ve given the tunnel a name on the Palo Alto firewall, we’ll use that name as the primary way we identify the tunnel in the UI.

 

There’s different information for VPN tunnels that are up and VPN tunnels that are down. If the tunnel is down, you’ll see the date and time it went down. You’ll also, in most cases, see whether the VPN tunnel failed negotiation in phase 1 or phase 2. This is the first piece of data you need to start isolating the problem, and it’s displayed right in monitoring. If the tunnel is up, you’ll see the date and time it came up and the algorithms protecting your traffic, including privacy/encryption and hashing/authenticity.

 

The thing I’m most excited about is in the last two columns. BANDWIDTH! Since VPN tunnel traffic is all encrypted, getting bandwidth usage is a pain. Using a flow tool like NTA, you can find the bandwidth if you know both peer IPs and are exporting flow post encryption. It takes some manual work, and you can only see traffic quantities because of the encryption. You can’t tell what endpoints or applications are talking. If you export flow prior to encryption, you can see what endpoints are talking, but you have to construct a big filter to match interesting traffic, and then you have no guarantee that traffic makes it through the VPN tunnel. The traffic has the additional overhead of encapsulation added, so pre-encryption isn’t a good way to understand bandwidth usage on the WAN either. The worst part is that VPN tunnels transit your WAN—one of the most expensive monthly bills IT shops have.

 

Network Insight for Palo Alto monitors bandwidth of each tunnel. All the data is normalized, so you can report on it for capacity, alert on it to react quickly when a tunnel goes down, and inspect it in all the advanced visualization tools of the Orion® Platform–including the PerfStack™ dashboard.

 

 

GlobalProtect Client VPN Monitoring

 

Why does it always have to be the CEO or some other executive who has problems with the VPN client on their laptop? When I was a network engineer, I hated troubleshooting client VPN. You have so little data available to you. It’s very easy to look utterly incompetent when someone comes to you and tells you their VPN service isn’t working, and when it’s the CEO, that’s not good. Network Insight for Palo Alto monitors GlobalProtect client VPN and keeps a record of every user session.

 

 

This makes it easy to spot the most common problems. If you see the same user failing to connect over and over, but other users are successful, you know it’s something on that client’s end and would probably check if login credentials are right. “No, I’m sure you didn’t forget your password. Sometimes the system forgets. Let’s reset your password because that often fixes it.” If lots of people can’t connect, you may check for problems on the Palo Alto firewall and the connection to the authentication resource.

 

Traffic Visibility by Policy

 

In this release, NetFlow Traffic Analyzer (NTA) is contributing to our latest Network Insight through an integration with Network Configuration Manager. NCM users who manage Palo Alto firewalls will see top traffic conversations by security policy on the NCM Policy Details page. Examining traffic by policy helps answer the question, "Who might be affected as I make changes to my security policies?"

 

 

Let's look at how we find this view. We'll start at the Node Details page for this firewall.

 

 

We'll use the slide-out menu in this view to select "Policies." This will take us to a list view of all the policies configured for zones on this device.

 

 

Selecting a policy from this list brings us to the Policy Details page.

 

 

Policies define security controls between zones configured on the firewall. For a Palo Alto firewall, a zone can include one or more interfaces. In this view, we're looking at all the conversations based on applications defined in the policy. It's a very different way of looking at conversations; this isn't a view of all traffic through a node or interface. Rather, it's a view related to the policy definition—so the endpoints in these conversations are running over the applications your security rules are based on. The mechanism here is filtering; we’re looking at application traffic that references the application IDs in your security policy. The endpoints in those conversations may be from any zone where you’re using this policy.

 

For an administrator considering changes at the policy level, this is a valuable tool to understand how those rules apply immediately to production services and what kinds of impacts changes to them will have. For this feature, you'll need both NCM and NTA. NTA, of course, requires NPM. NCM provides the configuration information, including the policy definition and the applications definitions. NTA reads application IDs from the flow records we receive from the Palo Alto Firewall, and correlates those with the policy configuration to generate this view. With NTA, of course, you can also easily navigate to more conventional node or interface views of the traffic traversing the firewall, and we integrate traffic information seamlessly into the Node Details page in NPM as well.

 

User Device Tracker’s Cameo

 

For most devices supported by User Device Tracker (UDT), all that's necessary are the SNMP credentials. We’ll pick up information about devices attached to ports from the information modeled in SNMP. But for some devices—the Cisco Nexus 5K, 7K, and 9K series switches, or the Palo Alto firewall—a set of command-line interface (CLI) credentials are required. We’ll log in to the box periodically to pick up the attached devices.

 

To support device tracking on these devices, you’ll need to supply a command line login. You can configure devices in bulk or individually in the Port Management section of the User Device Tracker settings page. Select "Manage Ports" to see the list of what devices can be configured.

 

 

Select one or more of these devices, edit their properties, and you'll find a section for configuring SNMP polling.

 

 

You’ll also find a section for configuring command-line polling. For devices requiring CLI access for device tracking—currently the Nexus switches and the Palo Alto firewall—you should enable CLI polling, and configure and test credentials here.

 

 

Be sure to enable Layer 3 polling for this device in the UDT Node Properties section as well.

 

You’ll see attached devices for these ports in the Node Details page, in the Port Details resource.

 

 

How Do I Get This Goodness?

 

To see all the features of Network Insight for Palo Alto, you’ll want to have several modules installed and working together.

  • Network Performance Monitor discovers and polls your Palo Alto firewall and retrieves and displays your site-to-site VPN and GlobalProtect client VPN connection information.
  • Network Configuration Manager collects your device configuration and provides a list of your security policies for zone-to-zone communication. This module tracks configuration changes over time and provides the context for policies spanning multiple devices.
  • NetFlow Traffic Analyzer collects flow data from the firewall and maps the traffic to policies in the Policy Details page. You can also view traffic through the firewall, or through specific interfaces.
  • User Device Tracker collects directly connected devices and provides a history of connections to the ports on the device.

 

You can demo these products individually, or install or upgrade from any installer available in your Customer Portal.

I’m excited to announce the general availability of SolarWinds Service Desk, the newest member in the SolarWinds product family, following the acquisition of Samanage.

 

SolarWinds Service Desk (SWSD) is a cloud-based IT service management solution built to streamline the way IT provides support and delivers services to the rest of the organization. The solution includes an ITIL-certified Service Desk with Incident Management, Problem Management, Change Management, Service Catalog, and Release Management, complemented by an integrated Knowledge Base. It also includes Asset Management, Risk and Compliance modules, open APIs, dashboards, and reporting.

 

Core Service Desk

SWSD includes a configurable Employee Service Portal, allowing employees to make their service requests, open and track their tickets, and find quick solutions through the knowledge base. The portal’s look and feel can be customized to your branding needs, and configurable page layouts support your organization’s unique service management processes.

 

 

 

 

For IT pros working the service desk, we provide an integrated experience that brings together all related records (for example, assets or knowledge base articles related to an incident or change records related to a problem), so that the agent can see all the information available to expedite the resolution.

 


 

 

In order to help agents prioritize work, Service Level Management (SLM) helps build and manage SLA policies directly within the service desk, including auto-escalation rules.

 

 

IT pros often need to be on the go, or need to respond to urgent service requests and incidents after hours. The SWSD mobile app, available on both iOS and Android mobile devices, allows agents to work on records, make approvals, and track the status of their work queue at all times.

 

Process Automation

 

Driving automation throughout all aspects of service delivery helps service desk groups drive faster, affordable, and highly consistent services to the rest of the organization. Process automation in SWSD uses custom rules logic to route, assign, prioritize, and categorize inbound tickets, change requests, and releases. The Service Catalog allows you to define and publish IT services (such as VM provisioning or password reset) and non-IT services (such as employee on-boarding) through the Employee Service Portal. The catalog forms defining those services are dynamic and can be configured to fit specific use cases, with little to no coding required.

 

 

The other part of defining any Service Catalog item is automated fulfillment workflow.

 

 

IT Asset Management and CMDB

 

SWSD offers full asset lifecycle management starting with the management of IT and non-IT asset inventories and an audit history of changes. Compliance risk analysis helps expose unmanaged software or out of support software and devices. Where applicable, asset information incorporates contract, vendor, and procurement data to provide a full view on assets under management.

 

 

The Configuration Management Database (CMDB) populated by service supporting configuration items (CIs) plays a critical role in providing better change, problem, and release management services. Knowing what CIs support each service and the dependencies between them help IT pros to better assess the risks and impacts related to IT changes, driving better root cause analysis (RCA) in Problem Management, as well as being better prepared for new software releases.

 

Integrations

 

Many service desk processes can be integrated into other IT and business processes. SolarWinds Service Desk comes with hundreds of out-of-box integrations and an open REST API, allowing you to make it a part of the workflows you need.

 

 

We are releasing a brand new integration today with Dameware Remote Everywhere (DRE). The great synergy between  SWSD and Dameware’s remote support capabilities allow agents to initiate a DRE session directly from a SWSD incident record.

 

 

Artificial Intelligence (AI)

AI is embedded in a few different SWSD functions, introducing a new level of automation and an improved time to resolution. Our machine learning algorithms analyze large sets of historical data, identify patterns, and accelerate key service management processes. There is a “smart” pop-up within the employee service portal that auto-suggests the best corresponding knowledge base articles and service catalog items that related to the keyword(s) typed in the search bar.

 

 

For agents, AI helps with automatic routing and classification of incoming incidents, reducing the impact of misclassifications and human errors. It also offers “smart suggestions” agents can leverage when working on a ticket. Smart suggestions are made based on keyword matching from historical analysis of similar issues -- those suggestions offer knowledge base articles or similar incidents, advising the agent on the best actions to take next.

 

 

Reports and Dashboards

 

SolarWinds Service Desk comes with dozens of out-of-the-box reports that analyze and visualize the service desk’s KPIs, health, and performance. Those reports help agents, managers, and IT executives make data driven decisions through insights, including trend reports, incident throughput, customer satisfaction (CSAT) scores, and SLA breaches.

 

 

Dashboards provide a real time and dynamic view of the service desk. Dashboards are comprised from a set of widgets that can be added, removed, and configured to adjust to the individual needs of the agent, manager, or organization.

 

 

 

 

This has been pretty packed inaugural product blog for us. I hope you found it useful. We’d love to get your feedback and ideas. Feel free to comment below or visit the SolarWinds Service Desk product forum here; we're quickly building it out.

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