As some organizations start to either move workloads to the cloud, or as they build new apps and services natively within the cloud, the number of hybrid deployments and environments are increasing exponentially. In these hybrid environments, it’s important to remember how critical it can be to retain a single pane of glass, allowing for visibility into your applications and infrastructure.

 

With the recent release of Server & Application Monitor v6.7 (SAM), we’ve built in support for monitoring containers for Docker, Mesos, and Kubernetes, giving you visibility infrastructure wide into physical, virtual, cloud, and now container infrastructure.  Check out SAM’s product page to see all of SAMs features and supported systems and applications.  As cloud services and cloud infrastructure continues to grow and see more adoption, Server & Application Monitor needs to grow with it. In this post, we’ll discuss some of the ways we’re supporting this growth, as we highlight several new additions to support Microsoft Azure PaaS services. We’ll dive deeply into three of these new additions below. And of course, as always, please let us know any additional content you’d like to see SAM monitor.   To begin these template and others, SAM is can be download here.

 

The three new templates I am going to cover today for Azure include:

  • Azure App Service
  • Azure SQL Database
  • Azure Event Hub

 

For all three of these templates, be sure to install a couple of PowerShell modules on the system that SAM is installed, allowing you to leverage the following PowerShell commands:

  • Install-Module -Name Azure
  • Install-Module -Name AzureRM

 

Azure App Service:

Application Template can be downloaded here - Microsoft Azure App Service.apm-template

 

Prerequisites:

  1. To connect with your Azure account, the following parameters are required:

     subcriptionID,ApplicationID,TenantID, Secret Key, Application Name

     Note: Azure App to monitor, with its name and ID, should have role set as 'contributor or Reader' in the Azure access control.

    2. Application name for which metrics will be calculated.

    3. Time interval for which data has to be fetched (in hours).

    4. PowerShell version supported 5.1 or above.

 

Script Argument:

  • Login credential to access Azure Portal. Azure details have to be passed in script arguments as per prerequisite #2.

Example:

             <SubscriptionID>,<TenantID>,<ApplicationID>,secretKey=<Enter SecretKey>,<ApplicationName>,TimeRange=<Time in hrs>

  • The ApplicationID with which you are making a connection to the Azure portal (as mentioned in Credential/Prerequisites) must be registered in Azure Active Directory as a contributor role for the monitored application.

        Reference link: https://support.solarwinds.com/Success_Center/Server_Application_Monitor_(SAM)/Knowledgebase_Articles/Add_an_Azure_Active_Directory_app_for_cloud_monitoring_in_the_Orion_Platform

 

Portions of this document were originally created by and are excerpted from the following sources:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/app-service/web-sites-monitor   

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/powershell/azure/authenticate-azureps?view=azurermps-6.7.0

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/powershell/module/azurerm.insights/?view=azurermps-6.7.0&viewFallbackFrom=azurermps6.7.0#monitor

 

MONITORED COMPONENTS

  • Average number of bytes sent

      This monitor provides the average number of bytes sent for the given app.

      Unit: MB (Mega Bytes)

  • Total number of 2xx requests

      This monitor provides the count of requests resulting in an HTTP status code >= 200 but < 300 for the given app.

      Unit: Count

  • Total number of 3xx requests

      This monitor provides the count of requests resulting in an HTTP status code >= 300 but < 400 for the given app.

      Unit: Count

  • Total number of 401 requests

      This monitor provides the count of requests resulting in HTTP 401 status code for the given app.

      Unit: Count

  • Total number of 403 requests

      This monitor provides the count of requests resulting in HTTP 403 status code for the given app.

      Unit: Count

  • Total number of 404 requests

      This monitor provides the count of requests resulting in HTTP 404 status code for the given app.

      Unit: Count

  • Total number of 406 requests

      This monitor provides the count of requests resulting in HTTP 406 status code for the given app.

      Unit: Count

  • Total number of 4xx requests

      This monitor provides the count of requests resulting in an HTTP status code >= 400 but < 500 for the given app.

      Unit: Count

  • Total number of 5xx requests

      This monitor provides the count of requests resulting in an HTTP status code >= 500 but < 600 for the given app.

      Unit: Count

  • Total number of requests served by the app

      This monitor provides the total number of requests regardless of their resulting HTTP status code for the given app.

      Unit: Count

  • Average number of bytes received

      This monitor provides the average number of bytes received for the given app.

      Unit: MB (Mega Bytes)

  • Average memory used

      This monitor provides the average amount of memory in MBs used by the given app.

      Unit: MB (Mega Bytes)

  • Average response time

      This monitor provides the average time taken for the app to serve requests in milliseconds (ms).

      Unit: MS (Milliseconds)

 

TROUBLESHOOTING STEPS

Detailed troubleshooting steps (common for template):

  • Check that the PowerShell version is 5.1 or more and the Azure module is installed on the system where the template will run.
  • Template uses PowerShell components; script should run with administrator privilege.

Be sure to detail troubleshooting steps (specific for components).

  • Components connect with Azure using service principal authentication for which application has to be created at the Azure portal. See below link:

     https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/azure-stack/azure-stack-create-service-principals

  • Provide Azure IAM permission to the application, which was created in the last step. See below link:

     https://support.solarwinds.com/Success_Center/Server_Application_Monitor_(SAM)/Knowledgebase_Articles/Configure_Azure_IAM_permissions_for_cloud_monitoring_in_the_Orion_Platform

  • Script fetch data based on time range given in last script arguments. By default, script fetch data for the past hour. While giving the time range, make sure the data is available for the metric at that time, otherwise the component will be unable to fetch the data.

 

Azure SQL Database:

Application Template can be downloaded here: Microsoft Azure SQL Database.apm-template

 

Prerequisites:

  1. To connect with your Azure account, the following parameter is required: subcriptionID, ApplicationID, TenantID, Secret Key.

Note: Any Azure App (with its name and ID) having role as 'Read Only'.

    2. SQL Server Database name for which metrics have to be calculated.

    3. Time interval for which data has to be fetched (in hours).

    4. PowerShell version 5.0 or later.

 

Credentials:

  1. Login credential to access your Azure Portal. This has to be passed as script arguments per prerequisite #2, as listed above. e.g. <subcriptionID>, <TenantID>, <ApplicationID>, value=<Secret Key>, <Application Name>, value=<Time Interval>, <Database Name>
  2. Windows Administrator on the machine where template would be running against.    

 

Portions of this document were originally created by and are excerpted from the following sources:

https://azure.microsoft.com/en-in/blog/windows-azure-sql-database-management-with-powershell/

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/monitoring-and-diagnostics/monitoring-supported-metrics

 

MONITORED COMPONENTS

  • Blocked Connections

      This metric provides the average number of firewall blocked connections established for the given SQL database during the time period specified as the polling frequency.

      Unit: Count

  • Failed Connections

      This monitor provides the average number of failed connections established for the given SQL database during the time period specified as the polling frequency.

      Unit: Count

  • Successful Connections

      This metric provides the average number of successful connections established for the given SQL database during the time period specified as the polling frequency.

      Unit: Count

  • Deadlocks

      This metric provides the average number of deadlocks established for the given SQL database during the time period specified as the polling frequency.

      Unit: Count

  • Database throughput units (DTU) limit

      This metric provides the average database throughput limit in units for the given SQL database during the time period specified as the polling frequency.

      Unit: Count

  • Database throughput units (DTU) used

      This metric provides the average database throughput units used for the given SQL database during the time period specified as the polling frequency.

      Unit: Count

  • Sessions percentage

      This metric provides the average percentage of available sessions used for the given SQL database during the time period specified as the polling frequency.

      Unit: Percent

  • Database size percentage

      This metric provides the average percentage of storage used for the given SQL database during the time period specified as the polling frequency.

      Unit: Percent

  • Total database size

      This metric provides the average for the total database size for the given SQL database during the time period specified as the polling frequency.

      Unit: Megabytes

  • Workers percentage

      This metric provides the average percentage of available workers used for the given SQL database during the time period specified as the polling frequency.

      Unit: Percent

  • Average CPU utilization

      This metric provides the average percent CPU used for the given SQL database during the time period specified as the polling frequency.

      Unit: Percent

  • Average IO utilization

      This metric provides the average percentage of data IO used for the given SQL database during the time period specified as the polling frequency.

      Unit: Percent

  • Average log utilization

      This metric provides the average percentage of log IO used for the given SQL database during the time period specified as the polling frequency.

      Unit: Percent

  • In-Memory OLTP storage percent

      This monitor provides the average In-Memory OLTP (Online Transaction Processing) storage percent for the given SQL database during the time period specified as the polling frequency.

      Unit: Percent

  • Database throughput unit (DTU) percentage

      This metric provides the average percentage of database throughput units used for the given SQL database during the time period specified as the polling frequency.

      Unit: Percent

 

Azure Event Hub:

Application Template can be downloaded from here: Microsoft Azure Event Hub Namespace.apm-template

 

Prerequisites:

  1. To connect with your Azure account, the following parameters are required: subcriptionID, ApplicationID, TenantID, Secret Key, Application Name

Note: Any Azure App (with its name and ID) having role as 'Read Only'.

 

  1. Namespace for which metrics have to be calculated.
  2. Time interval for which data has to be fetched (in hours).
  1. PowerShell version 5.0 or later.

 

Credentials:

  1. Login credential to access the Azure Portal. This has to be passed as script arguments per prerequisite #2, listed above. e.g. < subcriptionID>, < TenantID>, < ApplicationID>, value=<Secret Key>, <Application Name>, value=<Time Interval>, <Application Name>
  2. Windows Administrator on the machine where template would be running against.    

 

Portions of this document were originally created by and are excerpted from the following sources:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/event-hubs/event-hubs-quickstart-powershell

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/monitoring-and-diagnostics/monitoring-supported-metrics

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/event-hubs/event-hubs-metrics-azure-monitor


MONITORED COMPONENTS

  • Archive backlog messages

      This monitor provides total Archive messages in backlog for the given namespace via PowerShell cmd-let.

      Unit: Count

  • Archive message throughput

      This monitor provides total Event Hub archived message throughput for the given namespace via PowerShell cmd-let.

      Unit: Bytes

  • Archive messages

      This monitor provides total Event Hub archived messages for the given namespace via PowerShell cmd-let.

      Unit: Count

  • Incoming Bytes

      This monitor provides the total Event Hub incoming message throughput for the given namespace via PowerShell cmd-let.

      Unit: Bytes

  • Outgoing bytes

      This monitor provides the total Event Hub outgoing message throughput for the given namespace via PowerShell cmd-let.

      Unit: Bytes

  • Average Disk Seconds per Write

      Average Disk Seconds per Write is the average time of a write of data to the disk.

  • Incoming Messages

      This monitor provides the total incoming messages for the given namespace via PowerShell cmd-let.

      Unit: Count

  • Incoming Requests

      This monitor provides the Total incoming send requests for the given namespace via PowerShell cmd-let.

      Unit: Count

  • Internal Server Errors

      This monitor provides the Total internal server errors for the given namespace via PowerShell cmd-let.

      Unit: Count

  • Other Errors

      This monitor provides the total failed requests for the given namespace via PowerShell cmd-let.

      Unit: Count

  • Outgoing Messages

      This monitor provides the total outgoing messages for the given namespace via PowerShell cmd-let.

      Unit: Count

  • Successful Requests

      This monitor provides the total successful requests for the given namespace via PowerShell cmd-let.

      Unit: Count

  • Server Busy Errors

      This monitor provides the Total server busy errors for the given namespace via PowerShell cmd-let.

      Unit: Count

 

 

The SolarWinds trademarks, service marks, and logos are the exclusive property of SolarWinds Worldwide, LLC or its affiliates. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

I’m happy to announce General Availability of Storage Resource Monitor 6.7. This release continues the momentum of supporting arrays that you all requested on THWACK®. It also comes along with new functionality both that you all have asked for as well as some that we think you’ll be surprised by and excited to check out. So, without further ado, why don’t we take a look at what’s new? (Note: that rhymed)

 

(Also, don’t forget to check out the SRM 6.7 Release Notes for more information about installing, upgrading, and new fixes.)

 

New Array Support

As you have probably come to expect, the aforementioned support includes all the standard features you know and love: capacity utilization and forecasting, performance monitoring, end-to-end mapping in AppStack™, integrated performance troubleshooting in PerfStack™, and Hardware Health. Now, as of SRM 6.7, we support the following devices:

 

  • Huawei OceanStor v3 Series
  • Huawei OceanStor v5 Series
  • Huawei Dorado V3 Series

 

What’s that? You want to see the screenshots to prove it? We can provide that.

 

Summary View

 

Block Storage

 

File Storage

 

Hardware Health (don’t worry about the critical state – we’re on it.)

 

New Hardware Health Support

What if you were able to extend the previous screenshot to arrays that you’re already using SRM to monitor? And you were able to see details on fans, power supplies, batteries, and more? With SRM 6.7 you can do that for the following array vendors and types:

 

  • EMC Isilon v8
  • NetApp

 

How great is that? And yes, of course, here’s your screenshot:

 

 

 

Support for GTP Format Partitions

This is something we’ve heard from some of you recently. And you all have discussed it on THWACK as well. So, as normal, ask and you shall receive. With SRM 6.7, we have added support for GPT drives on Windows Server 2008 and later. Here’s a screenshot of what it’s going to look like when you’re selecting what to monitor (after that step, it’s going to be the same great experience you’ve come to expect from your MBR partitions):

Support for Storage in Orion Maps

This feature comes with a tremendous amount of capability. So much so, that we have dedicated blog posts on it. But before I link you to that, I’ll write a quick note about what it means for you and SRM.

 

Starting with our newest releases (which include SRM 6.7), Orion® Maps are now going to include data all the way down to your storage environment. That’s huge. Say, for example, if all you think (and want to think) about all day is storage, you can now open an Orion Maps view from your storage device screen and sit back as a map is built for you that shows you what VMs sit on top of that storage. Automatically—you don’t have to do a thing. How great is that? What you do with that information (read “who you go after”) is up to you.

 

And, you want a screenshot? Forget screenshots. This one is animated:

 

 

 

Again, there is a ton here to cover, so I’ll leave you with the short taste above and this link to a wonderfully written post on the topic.

 

What’s Next

That’s it for the meaty functionality of SRM 6.7. There was a lot there and we’re excited to share it all with you.

 

If you don’t see what you’re looking for, head over to our What We’re Working On post to see what our storage team is already working on for our next releases. If you don’t see what you want there, make sure to add it to the Storage Manager (Storage Profiler) Feature Requests page.

 

And of course, we want to know what you think—just let it be known below in the comments.

 

Disclaimer: The SolarWinds trademarks, service marks, and logos are the exclusive property of SolarWinds Worldwide, LLC or its affiliates.  All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

I am pleased and excited to announce the latest addition to the SolarWinds product family on the Orion® Platform, Server Configuration Monitor or SCM. For those of your that are familiar with our Network Configuration Manager product or NCM, this new product is its sibling with a focus on systems and applications.

With this new product, SolarWinds continues to deliver on our unexpected simplicity promise of building simple, powerful, and affordable products.  SCM, built on the Orion Platform, is designed to enable you to capture, visualize, and understand changes in your environment in near real-time.

With this first version, we are focused on Windows systems and enabling customers to version and diff the following elements.

  • Hardware
  • Software
  • Registry
  • Files
  • Microsoft IIS

 

While we have already delivered v1, the team is hard at work to continue to advance and expand this product as outlined in our “What We Are Working On” post.  SCM is licensed by nodes, a simple-to-understand model, and pricing is affordable to many.  Let’s walk through a couple of use cases of how you could use the product.

 

Web Application Outage:

At the same time that you receive an alert from Server & Application Monitor indicating a critical web application is down, you also begin to receive calls from users indicating they cannot access it.

 

Where do you start investigation to determine where the problem lies? 

  • Is this a networking problem?
  • Is the hardware having a problem?
  • Is this a storage or database problem?
  • Is this application running on your virtual platform and is that having an issue?

 

While investigating each of these areas, the clock is ticking and you are getting more and more calls. 

Using the SolarWinds® PerfStack dashboard for a real-time view into multiple different metrics and parameters, as highlighted in the below screenshot, I can see that right before the web application went down, a configuration change was detected.

 

 

In the data explorer, I click on the web.config link and I am immediately taken to a comparison or “diff” page showing me what changed here.  As you can see, someone went in and made some edits to this config file and now the XML structure is broken, which took down your web application.  Now you can quickly remote desktop into that machine and change this back, save the file, and get the web application back up and operational.  So, what may have taken 30-60 minutes to investigate the infrastructure and root cause was isolated and addressed typically in minutes with SCM.

 

 

Let’s briefly touch on a couple of other use cases for Server Configuration Monitor.

  • Unauthorized Software
  • Malware Security Incident
  • Hardware Change

 

THE ARCHITECTURE

So how does it work? It all depends on what you want to monitor. If you are only interested in hardware and software versioning, we can do this without an agent. However, if you want to monitor files for changes, registry, or Microsoft IIS, then you will need to deploy the Orion Agent onto this machine. If you already have the Orion Agent deployed on your machine (for example, for monitoring in SAM) SCM is an add-in package in the Orion Agent that just needs to be enabled. The key point I am making here is this is not a separate agent.

 

 

WHAT ELSE?

Don't see what you are looking for here?

 

Visit the SolarWinds Server Configuration Monitor forum.

Check out the What We're Working On for SolarWinds Server Configuration Monitor post to see what our dedicated team is already looking at.

If you don't see everything you've been wishing for there, add it to the SolarWinds SCM Feature Requests.

 

We are excited to get this out there and begin to gather input and feedback. Don’t forget you can quickly and easily install a free, fully featured 30-day trial to kick the tires yourself.

 

The SolarWinds trademarks, service marks, and logos are the exclusive property of SolarWinds Worldwide, LLC or its affiliates. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

Upgrading SolarWinds Orion Platform Products is Amazing

By Destiny Bertucci

 

 

          I know what you’re thinking right now, “She's out of her darn MIND!” Bear with me for a moment here. I’ve seen a lot of failed upgrades and pushback on upgrading systems to newer OS and application versions. However, I’ve seen more, even smoother upgrades in the past few years that have allowed me to want to make sure everyone has the best experience possible when upgrading.This means I’ve gathered information that can help you be more knowledgeable about why you should upgrade and to get the best features available all while achieving more secure options for your environment. Without further ado, let’s dive in.

 

          I’d like to start with some necessary information to help you prepare for upgrading, no matter what level you are currently on. I can help guide you to a better environment with the SolarWinds® Orion® Platform while maintaining proper control on how it should be done to help sidestep some “gotcha” moments.

  1. You must know what version you are on, period. When I say that, I mean I’d like for you to have a notepad or an Excel® sheet that allows you to have all the info on your environment readily available. I’ve attached the one I currently use while managing my environments.
  2. You’ll need to know where to find your version and upgrade path:
  3. If you are on 12.0 or above, use this: https://support.solarwinds.com/Success_Center/Orion_Platform/Orion_Documentation/SolarWinds_Orion_Installer
  4. If you are below 12.0, please use the following: https://customerportal.solarwinds.com/support/product-upgrade-advisor
  5. Check out Windows® version support for each level of SolarWinds Orion Platform products:  https://support.solarwinds.com/Success_Center/Orion_Platform/Knowledgebase_Articles/Windows_Server_2012_2016_and_SQL_Server_2012_2014_2016_and_2017_Support
  6. My favorite information is the migration guide. Because sometimes when you’re behind in the upgrade cycles, you realize you need a complete overhaul of your environment. Again, perfectly fine! Sometimes it’s even best to migrate when upgrading because you can stay up to date more easily on a new platform. So, this guide is one I keep near and dear to my heart: https://support.solarwinds.com/Success_Center/Network_Performance_Monitor_(NPM)/NPM_Documentation/Migration_Guide
  7. DBAs love information about the types of databases needed and/or used. Here’s a link to help everyone on your environment team be aware of the end game with databases: https://support.solarwinds.com/Success_Center/Orion_Platform/Knowledgebase_Articles/Databases_used_by_SolarWinds_modules
  8. SQL Server® requirements: https://support.solarwinds.com/Success_Center/Orion_Platform/Knowledgebase_Articles/Databases_used_by_SolarWinds_modules
  9. Port requirements: https://support.solarwinds.com/Success_Center/Network_Automation_Manager/NAM_Install_Guide/030/020
  10. Look up each module’s requirements, so you’re creating an environment that lasts and is a pleasant environment for users to use. There is nothing worse than waiting for the page to load because the database is underpowered OR the NetFlow database is underpowered for the number of flows you are using. Please acquaint yourself with the SolarWinds Customer Success Center and use it to find the system requirements you need. 
  11. Here is an excellent link from our awesome community members on in-place upgrades for SQL: https://thwack.solarwinds.com/message/398951#398951

        

           Now that you have gathered the information that you need, let’s talk about why you would want to upgrade. With the ability to use configurations within your network devices to visualize data, it’s vital to bring in these devices and use them to stay ahead of issues better and even solve some issues you may not have seen before.

         

          What in the world is she talking about now? Well, how about being able to see interface config snippets for your Cisco® devices on the interface details page? Or visualizing a switch stack for full redundancy, and using NetPath network path analysis  to break through your firewall to show you connection points from end to end? One major reason you may want to upgrade is to simplify your environment’s “break-down” moments. 

        

           SolarWinds has been working one-on-one with IT groups in all departments to understand and work to solve for their frustrations. Being able to visualize those virtual port channel bundles, for instance. Instead of waiting for an alert, it would be nice to shake out your monitoring and management environment to allow yourself to see clearly and make decisions based on your baselines that match your unique setup.

         

          Security-wise, let’s be honest… if you’re on an unsupported version of Windows or SQL Server, that’s a security issue, big time. If they’re not patchable, they are NOT on my environment. Security should be a focus for you, especially for older versions of .NET. Let’s get our heads in the game and start visualizing these upgrades and making them happen, you know, for security’s sake and all.

          All the data I provided here SHOULD allow you to have a successful upgrade in your future. If you have any suggestions for upgrading, please drop me a line!

 

 

~Dez~

The latest version of Server & Application Monitor (SAM) is now generally available. SAM v6.7 adds some very exciting and cool new features, which I will walk through in this post. If you are an existing customer, head on over to the customer portal to get the latest bits.

 

Outside of product releases, we’re also working on creating new or enhancing existing application template content for use in SAM. We recently published some content on THWACK®, which I covered here and here.

 

As always, we love to hear your feedback and how you would like to see them enhanced and evolve to help us continue to make SAM a better product.

 

Container Monitoring:

Available in both SAM and Virtualization Manager (VMAN), we have added our first version of container monitoring for Docker, Kubernetes, and Mesos. With this enhanced visibility, SAM can now provide insight into not just your physical infrastructure, but also virtual, cloud, and now container-based workloads.

 

Serena wrote up a document on this, going step-by-step through the configuration and deployment process, but essentially what we are doing is deploying a monitoring container within the container environment you wish to monitor. The information we are collecting is available in both AppStack and PerfStack for real-time troubleshooting.

 

In a future post, we will walk through how you can use SAM application templates to monitor applications in those containers.

 

Orion Maps and AppMap with ADM

The Orion® Maps team is on a roll coming off the initial release of Orion Maps in Q2, and this quarter they have added a bunch of new features, including support for leveraging the Application Dependency functionality added in SAM 6.6 to illustrate application or service dependencies in the maps.

 

Jeff Blank wrote up a very detailed and terrific document on these map enhancements here.

 

We think that these maps are fantastic because, first, they’re dynamic. Second, besides understanding the infrastructure relationships, the maps can help you understand which services and applications are talking to what and where.

 

Below is a screen grab from Jeff’s article illustrating these dependencies in an Active Directory environment.

 

 

 

SolarWinds APM Integration

For those who have been around SolarWinds for some time, I need you to put on your amnesia hats for a minute. I know back in the early days, SAM used to be called APM as well, but this is application performance management as defined by market analysts to give you code-level visibility into your custom applications.

 

SolarWinds® APM is a new product we are offering. It is designed to offer a very tight integration with SAM, giving users insight into their IIS-based, .NET applications natively within the SAM web console. SolarWinds APM is a cloud-based product based on SolarWinds AppOptics. In the screenshot below, we are pulling that data in real-time from the APM cloud service via API into the SAM console with the SAM look and feel from a charting and visual perspective.

 

When we were first considering this product and integration, we spoke with many SAM customers about their interest in functionality like this and how this typically flowed process-wise in their environments. The overwhelming feedback from folks was that with SAM and the other Orion Platform products, they had solid visibility into the infrastructure and off-the-shelf applications, but limited visibility into custom apps. When end users would report issues about these applications, it was hard for them to determine if it truly was a problem with the application or with something else.

 

If you upgrade to SAM v6.7, under the Settings page in the product, there is a new UI option called APM Deployment Summary. If you are interested in trying this product out, you can sign up for a 30-day trial directly from within SAM. The integration will be set up for you with your SAM deployment. SolarWinds APM can also be leveraged standalone as well if that is your preference—the option is yours.

 

 

The team is already hard at work on the next version of SAM, as you can see covered here in the “What We are Working On” post. Also, please keep the feedback coming on what you think and what you would like to see in the product in the ideas section of the forum.

Hot off the heels of my previous post of new Server & Application Monitor content for Microsoft SQL and Exchange, as well as SAP HANA, we also now have some new and enhanced content for monitoring your Oracle databases.   As mentioned in my previous blog post, this will be a steady drumbeat of releasing new and enhanced monitoring content for SAM, so please keep an eye out on THWACK® and I will keep you up to date via the product blog as well.

 

First off, as of today, these templates still require the additional components be installed and added to the Orion® Server and/or poller that these databases are being monitored from. We have documentation about this already in the Success Center here - https://support.solarwinds.com/Success_Center/Server_Application_Monitor_(SAM)/Knowledgebase_Articles/Configure_SAM_to_monitor_an_Oracle_Database_Server


Oracle Database: 
https://thwack.solarwinds.com/docs/DOC-203309

This template contains newly added performance and statistics counters for Oracle Database.

 

Prerequisites: Oracle client installed on Orion APM server. This is available from the SolarWinds customer portal under Additional Downloads.

Credentials: An Oracle username and password with read access to the Oracle tables.

 

MONITORED COMPONENTS

Components without predetermined threshold values provide guidance such as "Use the lowest threshold possible" or "Use the highest threshold possible" to help you find an appropriate threshold for your application. For more information, see http://knowledgebase.solarwinds.com/kb/questions/2415.

 

  • SGA Size

     This component monitor returns the System Global Area (SGA) as the part of the system memory (RAM) shared by all the processes belonging to a single Oracle database instance.

     Unit: Bytes

     Source: https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B28359_01/server.111/b28320/dynviews_3028.htm#REFRN30233

  • PGA Size

     Program Global Area (PGA) is a private memory region that contains the data and control information for a server process. Only a server process can access the PGA. Oracle Database reads and writes information in the PGA on behalf of the server process. Oracle Database automatically sizes the PGA by dynamically adjusting the portion of the PGA memory     

     dedicated to work areas, based on 20% of the SGA memory size. The minimum value is 10MB.

     PGA memory currently allocated by the process (including free PGA memory not yet released to the operating system by the server process)

     Unit: Bytes

     Source: https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B28359_01/server.111/b28320/dynviews_2098.htm#REFRN30186

  • Buffer Pool Size

     This component monitors the buffer pool size for the Oracle Database. The default buffer pool size is determined by the DB_CACHE_SIZE initialization parameter.

     Unit: Bytes

     Source: https://docs.oracle.com/en/database/oracle/oracle-database/12.2/refrn/V-BUFFER_POOL.html#GUID-1E70B05F-6E52-44B0-AFB3-5ADDA620008D

  • Shared Pool Size

     This component monitors the shared pool area size. The shared pool is a RAM area within the RAM heap that is created at startup time, a component of the System Global Area (SGA). The size depends on the size of your RAM.

     Unit: Bytes

     Source: https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14237/dynviews_2106.htm#REFRN30238

  • Buffer Pool Response Time

     This component monitors the buffer pool response time. The value should be low for good performance.

     The query below calculates response time for logical reads per second from buffer within an interval of 15 seconds.

     Unit: Seconds

     Source: https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/server.112/e40402/dynviews_3090.htm#REFRN30343

  • Single block read response time

     This component monitors the cumulative single-block read response time at the file level in seconds. This value should be low. A high value means a high latency.

     Unit: Seconds

     Source: https://docs.oracle.com/en/database/oracle/oracle-database/12.2/refrn/V-FILESTAT.html#GUID-9DF61EA4-EF94-4F60-B966-D1B9AFEFF3E0

  • Multi block read response time

     This component monitors the cumulative multi-block read response time at file level in seconds. This value should be low. A high value means a high latency.

     Unit: Seconds

     Source: https://docs.oracle.com/en/database/oracle/oracle-database/12.2/refrn/V-FILESTAT.html#GUID-9DF61EA4-EF94-4F60-B966-D1B9AFEFF3E0

  • Log write response time

     This component monitors log write response time. The response time here includes write time + wait time that log writer spent waiting.

     Unit: Seconds

     Source: https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E18283_01/server.112/e17110/statviews_4061.htm

     https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14237/statviews_3177.htm

  • Physical I/O total rate

     This component monitors the physical I/O total rate. The total rate includes read rate + write rate per sec.

     A high value means a better performance.

     Unit: Bytes/second

     Source: https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/server.112/e40402/dynviews_3090.htm

  • Physical I/O read rate

     This component monitors the physical I/O read rate per sec.

     A high value means a better performance.

     Unit: Bytes/second

     Source: https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/server.112/e40402/dynviews_3090.htm

  • Physical I/O write rate

     This component monitors the physical I/O write rate per sec.

     A high value means a better performance.

     Unit: Bytes/second

     Source: https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/server.112/e40402/dynviews_3090.htm

  • Commit latency

     This component monitors latency for commits by all users. If the value is null that means the number of commits per second is 0.

     Unit: Seconds

     Source: https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/server.112/e40402/dynviews_3090.htm

  • SQL*Net receive rate

     This component monitors SQL*Net receive rate (clients + dblinks). In other words, bytes received via SQL*Net from client + bytes received via SQL*Net from dblink.

     Unit: Bytes/second

     Source: https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B28359_01/server.111/b28320/dynviews_3086.htm

  • SQL*Net send rate

     This component monitors SQL*Net send rate (clients + dblinks). In other words, bytes sent via SQL*Net to client + bytes sent via SQL*Net to dblink.

     Unit: Bytes/second

     Source: https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B28359_01/server.111/b28320/dynviews_3086.htm

  • Active sessions total

     This component monitors the total number of active sessions at any moment.

     Unit: Count

     Source: - https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14237/dynviews_2088.htm

  • Active sessions waiting

     This component monitors the number of active sessions waiting to be run.

     Unit: Count

     Source: https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14237/dynviews_2088.htmCPU.

  • Active sessions working

     This component monitors the total number of active sessions currently executing on CPU.

     Unit: Count

     Source: https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14237/dynviews_2088.htm

  • Blocked sessions

     This component monitors the total number of sessions blocked by other sessions.

     Unit: Count

     Source: https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/server.112/e40402/dynviews_3017.htm

  • Connections

     This component monitors the total number of active connections at any point.

     Unit: Count

     Sources:

     https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14237/dynviews_2088.htm

     https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14237/dynviews_2129.htm

     https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B28359_01/server.111/b28320/dynviews_2098.htm

  • Request rate

     This component monitors the total number of incoming request per second. A high number of requests might be a reason for slow response.

     Unit: Count/second

     Source: https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/server.112/e40402/dynviews_3090.htm

  • Database Size (size of all tablespaces)

     This component monitors the total database size (size of all table spaces) of the Oracle Database. The default value is fetched in bytes.

     Unit: Bytes

     Sources:

     https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14237/statviews_3122.htm

     https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14237/statviews_3083.htm

  • Database Used Space (amount actually used)

     This component monitors the total database used space.

     Unit: Bytes

     Sources:

     https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14237/statviews_3122.htm

     https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14237/statviews_3083.htm

  • SQL Parse to execute ratio

     This component monitors SQL parsing to execute ratio.

     The query below will calculate the ratio by dividing parse count by execution count.  A higher ratio means better performance.

     Unit: Percent

     Source: https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B28359_01/server.111/b28320/dynviews_3086.htm

 

 

Oracle Automatic Storage Management:
https://thwack.solarwinds.com/docs/DOC-203310

This template contains newly added performance and statistics counters for Oracle ASM.

 

Prerequisites: Oracle client installed on the Orion SAM server. This is available from the SolarWinds customer portal[TK5] under Additional Downloads.

Credentials: An Oracle username and password with read access to the Oracle tables.

 

MONITORED COMPONENTS

Components without predetermined threshold values provide guidance such as "Use the lowest threshold possible" or "Use the highest threshold possible" to help you find an appropriate threshold for your application. For more information, see http://knowledgebase.solarwinds.com/kb/questions/2415.

 

  • Average Write Throughput

     This component monitor fetches the value for average write throughput for all disks under ASM disk group. The returned value will only show the results since the last polling period.

     Unit: MB/second

     Source: https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14237/dynviews_1019.htm#REFRN30170

  • Average Read throughput

     This component monitor fetches the value for average read throughput for all disks under ASM disk group. The returned value will only show the results since the last polling period.

     Unit: MB/second

     Source: https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14237/dynviews_1019.htm#REFRN30170

  • Average write latency

     This component monitor fetches the value for average write latency per MB for all disks under ASM disk group, at any time. The returned value will only show the results since the last polling period.

     Unit: Milliseconds

     Source: https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14237/dynviews_1019.htm#REFRN30170

  • average read latency

     This component monitor fetches the value for average read latency per read request for all disks under ASM disk group, at any time. The returned value will only show the results since the last polling period.

     Unit: Milliseconds

     Source: https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14237/dynviews_1019.htm#REFRN30170

  • average i/o read request

     This component monitors average number of I/O read requests for the disk group. The returned value will only show the results since the last polling period.

     Unit: Count.

     Source: https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14237/dynviews_1019.htm#REFRN30170

  • average i/o write request

     This component monitors average number of I/O write requests for the disk group. The returned value will only show the results since the last polling period.

     Unit: Count.

     Source: https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14237/dynviews_1019.htm#REFRN30170

 

 

Oracle Dataguard:
https://thwack.solarwinds.com/docs/DOC-203308

This template contains performance and statistics counters for Oracle Dataguard.

 

Prerequisites: Oracle client installed on the Orion SAM server. This is available from the SolarWinds customer portal[TK6] under Additional Downloads.

Credentials: An Oracle username and password with read access to the Oracle tables.

 

MONITORED COMPONENTS

Components without predetermined threshold values provide guidance such as "Use the lowest threshold possible" or "Use the highest threshold possible" to help you find an appropriate threshold for your application. For more information, see http://knowledgebase.solarwinds.com/kb/questions/2415

 

  • LOG APPLY GAP

     This component monitors the number of logs the secondary server has not yet applied.

     The greater the value, the lower the protection. The returned value will only show the results since the last polling period.

     Unit: Count

     Source:

     https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B14117_01/server.101/b10755/dynviews_1126.htm

     https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B14117_01/server.101/b10755/dynviews_1011.htm

     https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B13789_01/server.101/b10755/dynviews_1015.htm

     https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B13789_01/server.101/b10755/dynviews_1054.htm

  • Log Apply LAG

     This component monitors how long it is taking the secondary to apply logs.

     The returned value will only show the results since the last polling period.

     Unit: Seconds

     Source:

     https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B14117_01/server.101/b10755/dynviews_1126.htm

     https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B14117_01/server.101/b10755/dynviews_1011.htm

     https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B13789_01/server.101/b10755/dynviews_1015.htm

     https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B13789_01/server.101/b10755/dynviews_1054.htm

  • Log Destination error.

     This component monitors the count of error(s) that have occurred on any of the destinations while applying redo logs.

     Unit: Count

     Source:

     https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B13789_01/server.101/b10755/dynviews_1061.htm

     https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B14117_01/server.101/b10755/dynviews_1011.htm

 

The SolarWinds trademarks, service marks, and logos are the exclusive property of SolarWinds Worldwide, LLC or its affiliates.  All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

Content is key as new applications get released to the market, as well as new versions of products that have been out there for some time. Application templates are a critical component of what makes Server & Application Monitor (SAM) great and we’re constantly taking feedback on how to enhance the content we have and what additional content folks would like to see. The following post is part 1 of more to come on net-new and enhanced application monitoring templates for Server & Application Monitor. As always, if you have comments or feedback, please let us know and if there are any application templates you would like to see that we do not offer today, please let us know.

 

SAP HANA:

SAP HANA is a net-new addition to our library. Unlike many of our other templates, there are some prerequisites to get monitoring to work properly.

 

This template can be found on THWACK® at the following URL, or, if you have SAM, you can look at the application templates page, which connects to SAM.

SAP HANA 2.0.apm-template

From the server that will be polling your HANA instances, you’ll need the 32-bit or 64-bit HANA ODBC drivers. You should be able to download these from the SAP portal. You also need the ODBC credentials to access SAP HANA 2.0 Express Edition. Note that if you install the 64-bit version, you will need to update the template to use the 64-bit job engine vs. default 32-bit.

 

If you have an account for the SAP Support Portal (customer, partner, ask-your-administrator), just enter SAP HANA client in the search bar. Take 2.0 and select the operating system (such as Windows).

If you don’t have an SAP support account, you can also download the SAP HANA client from the Developer community, https://www.sap.com/developer/trials-downloads.htmlThis will direct you to the SAP store; it also requires an account but this one is free.


The metrics we are gathering for HANA include the following. (If you want more details on what the counters mean, how they are calculated, and any reference documentation, please see the links to the templates. In this case, for HANA,
SAP HANA 2.0.apm-template.)

 

  • CPU Utilization %
  • I/O Read Throughput in MB - DATA volume
  • I/O Read Throughput in MB - LOG Volume
  • I/O Write Throughput in MB - DATA Volume
  • I/O Write Throughput in MB - LOG Volume
  • System Memory Used %
  • Heap Memory Used %
  • Connections
  • Active Statements
  • Active Procedures
  • Table Lock Count
  • Record Lock Count
  • Blocked Transaction Count

 

Here is how this looks in SAM:

 

 

Enhanced Exchange 2016:

Next up is a set of enhancements to an existing template we already offer today, Microsoft Exchange 2016. We just added some new experience monitors as well as some component monitors within the template itself.

https://thwack.solarwinds.com/docs/DOC-203053
https://thwack.solarwinds.com/docs/DOC-203054
https://thwack.solarwinds.com/docs/DOC-203055
https://thwack.solarwinds.com/docs/DOC-203056

 

There are now four templates available for Exchange 2016.

  • Active Sync Connectivity
  • Edge Transport Role Counters & Services
  • Mailbox Role Counters & Services
  • OWA Form Login (PowerShell)

 

 

Prerequisites:

  1. WMI access to the Exchange server.
  2. Credentials: Windows Administrator on the target server.
  3. To run template “Exchange Active Sync Connectivity Template”:
      1. Exchange 2016 Management tool should also be installed on the machine. Once it’s installed, import this tool utility in PowerShell via this command:
        Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.Exchange.Management.PowerShell.SnapIn;
      2. Double-click on Exchange Server installer. It will ask the folder where you need to save the extracted files. Once extraction is completed, go to the Scripts folder and run the script “new-testcasconnectivityuser.ps1”—this script creates the test user, which helps in fetching the output from the command “Test-ActiveSyncConnectivity” used in the script.
      3. “Test-ActiveSyncConnectivity” needs Client Access Server (CAS). You can find this server name by executing the PowerShell command “Get-ExchangeServer” and note the “Name” value.
      4. Test to ensure http://<Hostname>/powershell or https://<Hostname>/powershell should be working.
  4. To run template “Exchange 2016 OWA Form Login (PowerShell)”:
      1. Resolve the IP of the node this script will run against, make an entry of that IP in etc/hosts file.
      2. Test to ensure http://<Hostname>/owa or https://<Hostname>/owa should be working.

 

SQL 2016 on Windows:

You can read more about and download these two templates here.

https://thwack.solarwinds.com/docs/DOC-203050
https://thwack.solarwinds.com/docs/DOC-203051

 

There are now two templates available for SQL Server 2016 on Windows.

  • Analysis Services
  • Reporting Services

 

For SQL 2016 Analysis Services, we are collecting the following metrics/info.

  • Service: SQL Server Analysis Services
  • Cache: Direct hits/sec
  • Cache: Lookups/sec
  • Cache: Direct hit ratio
  • Cache: Current entries
  • Cache: Current KB
  • Cache: Inserts/sec
  • Cache: Evictions/sec
  • Cache: Misses/sec
  • Cache: KB added/sec
  • Cache: Total direct hits
  • Cache: Total evictions
  • Cache: Total filtered iterator cache hits
  • Cache: Total filtered iterator cache misses
  • Cache: Total inserts
  • Cache: Total lookups
  • Cache: Total misses
  • Connection: Current connections
  • Connection: Current user sessions
  • Connection: Requests/sec
  • Connection: Failures/sec
  • Connection: Successes/sec
  • Connection: Total failures
  • Connection: Total requests
  • Connection: Total successes
  • Data Mining Prediction: Queries/sec
  • Data Mining Prediction: Predictions/sec
  • Locks: Current latch waits
  • Locks: Current lock waits
  • Locks: Current locks
  • Locks: Lock waits/sec
  • Locks: Total deadlocks detected
  • Locks: Latch waits/sec
  • Locks: Lock denials/sec
  • Locks: Lock grants/sec
  • Locks: Lock requests/sec
  • Locks: Unlock requests/sec
  • MDX: Total NON EMPTY unoptimized
  • MDX: Total recomputes
  • MDX: Total Sonar subcubes
  • Memory: Cleaner Memory shrinkable KB
  • Memory: Cleaner Memory nonshrinkable KB
  • Memory: Cleaner Memory KB
  • Memory: Cleaner Balance/sec
  • Memory: Filestore KB
  • Memory: Filestore Writes/sec
  • Memory: Filestore IO Errors/sec
  • Memory: Quota Blocked
  • Memory: Filestore Reads/sec
  • Proactive Caching: Notifications/sec
  • Proactive Caching: Processing Cancellations/sec
  • Proc Aggregations: Temp file bytes written/sec
  • Processing: Rows read/sec
  • Processing: Rows written/sec
  • Processing: Total rows read
  • Processing: Rows converted/sec
  • Processing: Total rows converted
  • Processing: Total rows written
  • Storage Engine Query: Queries from cache direct/sec
  • Storage Engine Query: Queries from cache filtered/sec
  • Storage Engine Query: Queries from file/sec
  • Storage Engine Query: Avg time/query
  • Storage Engine Query: Measure group queries/sec
  • Storage Engine Query: Dimension queries/sec
  • Threads: Processing pool idle I/O job threads
  • Threads: Processing pool busy I/O job threads
  • Threads: Processing pool job queue length
  • Threads: Processing pool job rate

 

Here is how that will look in SAM:

 

For Reporting Services, we are collecting the following metrics/info:

  • MSRS Windows Service: Active Sessions
  • MSRS Windows Service: Cache Flushes/Sec
  • MSRS Windows Service: Cache Hits/Sec
  • MSRS Windows Service: Cache Hits/Sec (Semantic Models)
  • MSRS Windows Service: Cache Misses/Sec
  • MSRS Windows Service: Cache Misses/Sec (Semantic Models)
  • MSRS Windows Service: Delivers/Sec
  • MSRS Windows Service: Events/Sec
  • MSRS Windows Service: Memory Cache Hits/Sec
  • MSRS Windows Service: Memory Cache Miss/Sec
  • MSRS Windows Service: Reports Executed/Sec
  • MSRS Windows Service: Requests/Sec
  • MSRS Windows Service: Snapshot Updates/Sec
  • MSRS Windows Service: Total Processing Failures
  • MSRS Windows Service: Total Rejected Threads
  • MSRS Windows Service: Report Requests
  • MSRS Windows Service: First Session Requests/Sec
  • MSRS Windows Service: Next Session Requests/Sec
  • MSRS Windows Service: Total App Domain Recycles
  • MSRS Windows Service: Total Cache Flushes
  • MSRS Windows Service: Total Cache Hits
  • MSRS Windows Service: Total Cache Hits (Semantic Models)
  • MSRS Windows Service: Total Cache Misses
  • MSRS Windows Service: Total Cache Misses (Semantic Models)
  • MSRS Windows Service: Total Deliveries
  • MSRS Windows Service: Total Events
  • MSRS Windows Service: Total Memory Cache Hits
  • MSRS Windows Service: Total Memory Cache Misses
  • MSRS Windows Service: Total Reports Executed
  • MSRS Windows Service: Total Requests
  • MSRS Windows Service: Total Snapshot Updates
  • Report Server: Active Connections
  • Report Server: Bytes Received/sec
  • Report Server: Bytes Sent/sec
  • Report Server: Errors/sec
  • Report Server: Logon Attempts/sec
  • Report Server: Logon Successes/sec
  • Report Server: Memory Pressure State
  • Report Server: Memory Shrink Amount
  • Report Server: Memory Shrink Notifications/sec
  • Report Server: Requests Executing
  • Report Server: Requests/sec
  • Report Server: Tasks Queued
  • Service: SQL Server Reporting Services
  • Report Server TCP Port
  • Report Server: Bytes Received Total
  • Report Server: Bytes Sent Total
  • Report Server: Errors Total
  • Report Server: Logon Attempts Total
  • Report Server: Logon Successes Total
  • Report Server: Requests Disconnected
  • Report Server: Requests Not Authorized
  • Report Server: Requests Rejected
  • Report Server: Requests Total

 

SQL 2017 on Windows:

You can read more about and download the template here.
https://thwack.solarwinds.com/docs/DOC-203052

 

This template uses Windows performance counters to assess the status and performance of Microsoft SQL Server 2017 Analysis Services.

 

Prerequisites:

 

Below are the metrics and counters we will gather:

  • Service: SQL Server Analysis Services
  • Cache: Direct hits/sec
  • Cache: Lookups/sec
  • Cache: Direct hit ratio
  • Cache: Current entries
  • Cache: Current KB
  • Cache: Inserts/sec
  • Cache: Evictions/sec
  • Cache: Misses/sec
  • Cache: KB added/sec
  • Cache: Total direct hits
  • Cache: Total evictions
  • Cache: Total filtered iterator cache hits
  • Cache: Total filtered iterator cache misses
  • Cache: Total inserts
  • Cache: Total lookups
  • Cache: Total misses
  • Connection: Current connections
  • Connection: Current user sessions
  • Connection: Requests/sec
  • Connection: Failures/sec
  • Connection: Successes/sec
  • Connection: Total failures
  • Connection: Total requests
  • Connection: Total successes
  • Data Mining Prediction: Queries/sec
  • Data Mining Prediction: Predictions/sec
  • Locks: Current latch waits
  • Locks: Current lock waits
  • Locks: Current locks
  • Locks: Lock waits/sec
  • Locks: Total deadlocks detected
  • Locks: Latch waits/sec
  • Locks: Lock denials/sec
  • Locks: Lock grants/sec
  • Locks: Lock requests/sec
  • Locks: Unlock requests/sec
  • MDX: Total NON EMPTY unoptimized
  • MDX: Total recomputes
  • MDX: Total Sonar subcubes
  • Memory: Cleaner Memory shrinkable KB
  • Memory: Cleaner Memory nonshrinkable KB
  • Memory: Cleaner Memory KB
  • Memory: Cleaner Balance/sec
  • Memory: Filestore KB
  • Memory: Filestore Writes/sec
  • Memory: Filestore IO Errors/sec
  • Memory: Quota Blocked
  • Memory: Filestore Reads/sec
  • Proactive Caching: Notifications/sec
  • Proactive Caching: Processing Cancellations/sec
  • Proc Aggregations: Temp file bytes written/sec
  • Proc Aggregations: Current partitions
  • Proc Aggregations: Total partitions
  • Proc Aggregations: Memory size rows
  • Proc Aggregations: Memory size bytes
  • Proc Aggregations: Rows merged/sec
  • Proc Aggregations: Rows created/sec
  • Proc Aggregations: Temp file rows written/sec
  • Processing: Rows read/sec
  • Processing: Rows written/sec
  • Processing: Total rows read
  • Processing: Rows converted/sec
  • Processing: Total rows converted
  • Processing: Total rows written
  • Storage Engine Query: Queries from cache direct/sec
  • Storage Engine Query: Queries from cache filtered/sec
  • Storage Engine Query: Queries from file/sec
  • Storage Engine Query: Avg time/query
  • Storage Engine Query: Measure group queries/sec
  • Storage Engine Query: Dimension queries/sec
  • Threads: Processing pool idle I/O job threads
  • Threads: Processing pool busy I/O job threads
  • Threads: Processing pool job queue length
  • Threads: Processing pool job rate

 

The SolarWinds trademarks, service marks, and logos are the exclusive property of SolarWinds Worldwide, LLC or its affiliates.  All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

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