Managing storage is a constant dance of making sure resources are available for the applications that need them, and making sure resources are constantly in use, because having wasted resources in addition to no resources can be problem. SolarWinds® Storage Resource Monitor helps make this dance a little less complicated. Over the next few posts I am not only going to show different parts of Storage Resource Monitor in relation to storage performance, but also how each of these parts can give you the information you need to monitor your environment and maximize one of your largest IT investments.

 

To start, we will address some basic information regarding storage performance and how Storage Resource Monitor presents the data. Based on customer feedback, one of the best things about SRM is that users are able to quickly view and understand their storage performance problems. Below, I will show you what initial performance information SRM provides, and ways to interpret the data. Depending on your environment, there will always be different ways to interpret performance data, so your mileage will vary.

 

Here we have part of the SRM Summary screen. In one simple view you get a list of storage devices being monitored, alerts, events, and performance and capacity summaries. The All Storage Objects widget will not only show you all the storage devices, but also point to devices that are having problems using easy-to-see green, yellow, and red notifications. To get to the exact cause, you can drill down into the array date until you get to the specific storage resource with the problem. A faster way to recognize performance problems is with either All Active Alerts or Storage Objects by Performance Risk.

                        

 

The Storage Objects by Performance Risk will give you a summary of performance problems based and sorted by latency. Like most things, high latency is not an ideal situation. However, the definition of "high" varies by environment and application. In addition to latency, IOPS and throughput are shown, and you can tailor the thresholds for the resources to be more specific to your requirements. Using this allows you to select your top performance problems by latency at the main screen without any digging. 

 

                             

In addition to the performance information on the SRM Summary screen, the Performance Dashboard lets you see additional performance data points. It includes the performance objects by risk and information for LUNs by Performance and NAS Volumes by Performance. Any of these sections will allow you to instantly dig into the specific storage resource that is experiencing performance problems.

              

 

This data allows you to instantly address performance problems. To see overall performance at the array and/or storage pool level, SRM gives you access to that data in a mere one or two clicks.  For array-specific performance information, select an array in the All Storage Objects section and the Array Details screen will show detailed information for that array. Clicking once more in the All Storage Objects section will show the storage pools and allow you to select the Storage Pool Details screen for each pool. Going even lower will show all the LUNs assigned to each pool.  Selecting a LUN will bring up the LUN Details screen.   Each of these screens will present specific performance information as it relates to that storage resource.

 

Array Details

 

Storage Pool Details

 

LUN Details

 

Now, what do these high-level performance views do for the end-user? Right from the start, you can instantly discover, identify, and start troubleshooting performance problems. The goal is that the critical problems are up front, and the need to check each storage device one by one for problems is eliminated. In addition, having the ability to customize the dashboards and information is critical to tailoring the monitoring to your needs.

 

My next post will cover the three specific layers we use to help you monitor your storage performance: array, storage pool, and LUN/volume.

 

I would love to hear your feedback about how SRM has helped you monitor your storage performance. Please leave comments and questions below.