On the surface, application performance management (APM) is simply defined as the process of maintaining acceptable user experience with respect to any given application by "keeping applications healthy and running smoothly." The confusion comes when you factor in all the interdependencies and nuances of what constitutes an application, as well as what “good enough” is.

 

APM epitomizes the nature vs nurture debate. In this case, nurture is the environment, the infrastructure, and networking services, as well as composite application services. On the other hand, nature is the code level elements formed by the application’s DNA. The complexity of nature and nurture also plays a huge role in APM because one can nurture an application using a multitude of solutions, platforms, and services. Similarly, the nature of the application can be coded using a variety of programming languages, as well as runtime services. Regardless of nature or nurture, APM strives to maintain good application performance.

 

And therein lies the million dollar APM question: What is good performance? And similarly, what is good enough in terms of performance? Since every data center environment is unique, good can vary from organization to organization, even within the same vertical industry. The key to successful APM is to have proper baselines, trends reporting, and tracing to help ensure that Quality-of-Service (QoS) is always met without paying a premium in terms of time and resources while trying to continuously optimize an application that may be equivalent to a differential equation.

 

Let me know in the comment section what good looks like with respect to the applications that you’re responsible for.