The title of this post raises an important question and one that seems to be on the mind of everyone who works in an infrastructure role these days. How are automation and orchestration going to transform my role as an infrastructure engineer? APIs seem to be all the rage, and vendors are tripping over themselves to integrate northbound APIs, southbound APIs, dynamic/distributed workloads, and abstraction layers anywhere they can. What does it all mean for you and the way you run your infrastructure?

 

My guess is that it probably won’t impact your role all that much.

 

I can see the wheels turning already. Some of you are vehemently disagreeing with me and want to stop reading now, because you see every infrastructure engineer only interacting with an IDE, scripting all changes/deployments. Others of you are looking for validation for holding on to the familiar processes and procedures that have been developed over the years. Unfortunately, I think both of those approaches are flawed. Here’s why:

 

Do you need to learn to code? To some degree, yes! You need to learn to script and automate those repeatable tasks that you can save time being run via script. The thing is, this isn’t anything new. If you want to be an excellent infrastructure engineer, you’ve always needed to know how to script and automate tasks. If anything, this newly minted attention being placed on automation should make it less of an effort to achieve (anyone who’s had to write expect scripts for multiple platforms should be nodding their head at this point). A focus on automation doesn’t mean that you just now need to learn how to use these tools. It means that vendors are finally realizing the value and making this process easier for the end-user. If you don’t know how to script, you should pick a commonly used language and start learning it. I might suggest Python or PowerShell if you aren’t familiar with any languages just yet.

 

Do I need to re-tool and become a programmer?  Absolutely not! Programming is a skill in and of itself, and infrastructure engineers will not need to be full-fledged programmers as we move forward. By all means, if you want to shift careers, go for it. We need full-time programmers who understand how infrastructure really works. But, automation and orchestration aren’t going to demand that every engineer learn how to write their own compilers, optimize their code for obscure processors, or make their code operate across multiple platforms. If you are managing infrastructure through scripting, and you aren’t the size of Google, that level of optimization and reusability isn’t going to be necessary to see significant optimization of your processes. You won’t be building the platforms, just tweaking them to do your will.

 

Speaking of platforms, this is the main reason why I don’t think your job is really going to change that much. We’re in the early days of serious infrastructure automation. As the market matures, vendors are going to be offering more and more advanced orchestration platforms as part of their product catalog. You are likely going to interface with these platforms via a web front end or a CLI, not necessarily through scripts or APIs. Platforms will have easy-to-use front ends with an engine on the back end that does the scripting and API calls for you. Think about this in the terms of Amazon AWS. Their IaaS products are highly automated and orchestrated, but you primarily control that automation from a web control panel. Sure, you can dig in and start automating some of your own calls, but that isn’t really required by the large majority of organizations. This is going to be true for on-premises equipment moving forward as well.

 

Final Thoughts

 

Is life for the infrastructure engineer going to drastically change because of a push for automation? I don’t think so. That being said, scripting is a skill that you need in your toolbox if you want to be a serious infrastructure engineer. The nice thing about automation and scripting is that it requires predictability and standardization of your configurations, and this leads to stable and predictable systems. On the other hand, if scripting and automation sound like something you would enjoy doing as the primary function of your job, the market has never been better or had more opportunities to do it full time. We need people writing code who have infrastructure management experience.

 

Of course, I could be completely wrong about all of this, and I would love to hear your thoughts in the comments either way.