If I learned anything from Tetris, it’s that errors pile up and accomplishments disappear.

– Andrew Clay Shafer (@littleidea on Twitter).

 

In IT, we make our money and maintain our job by being right. And we have to be right more often than not because the one time we are wrong might cost us our job. This kind of pressure can lead to a defensive, siloed mentality. If might equals right, then look for an IT working environment that is conducive to hostilities and sniping.

 

I’ve witnessed firsthand the destructive nature of a dysfunctional IT organization. Instead of working as a cohesive team, that team was one in which team members would swoop in to fix issues only after a colleague made a mistake. It was the ultimate representation of trying to rise to the top over the corpses of colleagues. Where did it all go wrong? Unfortunately, that IT organization incentivized team members to outdo one another for the sake of excellent performance reviews and to get ahead in the organization. It was a form of constant hazing. There were no mentors to help guide young IT professionals to differentiate between right and wrong.

 

Ultimately, it starts and ends with leadership and leaders. If leaders allow it, bad behaviors will remain pervasive in the organization’s culture. Likewise, leaders can nip such troubling behavior in the bud if they are fair, firm, and consistent. That IT team’s individual contributors were eventually re-organized and re-assigned once their leaders were dismissed and replaced.

 

Rewards and recognition come and go. Sometimes it’s well-deserved and other times we don’t get the credit that’s due. Errors, failures, and mistakes do happen. Don’t dwell on them. Continue to [ learn and ] move forward. A career in IT is a journey and a long one at that. Mentees do have fond memories of mentors taking the time to help them become a professional. Lastly, remember that kindness is not weakness, but rather an unparalleled kind of strength.