There’s no question that trends in IT change on a dime and have done so for as long as technology has been around. The hallmark of a truly talented IT professional is the ability to adapt to those ever-present changes and remain relevant, regardless of the direction that the winds of hype are pushing us this week. It’s challenging and daunting at times, but adaptation is just part of the gig in IT engineering.

 

Where are we headed?

 

Cloud (Public) - Organizations are adopting public cloud services in greater numbers than ever. Whether it be Platform, Software, or Infrastructure as a Service, the operational requirements within enterprises are being reduced by relying on third parties to run critical components of the infrastructure. To realize cost savings in this model, operational (aka employee) and capital (aka equipment) costs must be reduced for on-premises services.

 

Cloud (Private) - Due to the popularity of public cloud options, and the normalization of the dynamic/flexible infrastructure that they provide, organizations are demanding that their on-premises infrastructure operate in a similar fashion. Or in the case of hybrid cloud, operate in a coordinated fashion with public cloud resources. This means automation and orchestration are playing much larger roles in enterprise architectures. This also means that the traditional organizational structures of highly segmented skill specialties (systems, database, networking, etc.) are being consumed by engineers who have experience in multiple disciplines.

 

Commoditization - When I reference commoditization here, it isn’t about the ubiquity and standardization of hardware platforms. Instead, I’m talking about the way that enterprise C-level leadership is looking at technology within the organization. Fewer organizations are investing in true engineering/architecture resources, and instead are bringing those services in either via utilization of cloud infrastructure, or bringing this skill set on through consultation. The days of working your way from a help desk position up to a network architecture position within one organization are slowly fading away.

 

So what does all of this mean for you?

It’s time to skill up. Focusing on one specialty and mastering only that isn’t going to be as viable a career path as it once was. Breadth of knowledge across disciplines is going to help you stand out because organizations are starting to look for people who can help them manage their cloud initiatives. Take some time to learn how the large public cloud providers like AWS, Azure, and Google Compute operate and how to integrate organizations into them. Spend some time learning how hyperconverged platforms work and integrate into legacy infrastructures. Finally, learn how to script in an interpreted (non-compiled) programming language. Don’t take that as advice to change career paths and become a programmer.  That line of thinking is a bit overhyped in my opinion. However, you should be able to do simple automation tasks on your own, and modify other people’s code to do what you need. All of these skills are going to be highly sought after as enterprises move into more cloud-centric infrastructures.

 

Don’t forget a specialty. While a broad level of knowledge is going to be prerequisite as we go forward, I still believe having a specialty in one or two specifics areas will help from a career standpoint. We still need experts, we just need those experts to know more than just their one little area of the infrastructure. Pick something you are good at and enjoy, and then learn it as deeply as you possibly can, all while keeping up with the infrastructure that touches/uses your specialty. Sounds easy, right?

 

Consider what your role will look like in 5-10 years. This speaks to the commoditization component of the trends listed above. If your aspiration is to work your way into an engineering or architecture-style role, the enterprise may not be the best place to do that as we move forward. My prediction is that we are going to see many of those types of roles move to cloud infrastructure companies, web scale organizations, resellers/consultants, and the technology vendors themselves. It’s going to get harder to find organizations that want to custom-design their infrastructure to match and enhance their business objectives, instead opting to keep administrative-level technicians on staff and leave the really fun work to outside entities. Keep this in mind when plotting your career trajectory.

 

Do nothing. This is bad advice, and not at all what I would recommend, but it is an equally viable path. Organizations don’t turn on a dime (even though our tech likes to), so you probably have 5 to 10 years of coasting ahead. You might be able to eek out 15 if you can find an organization that is really change averse and stubbornly attached to their own hardware. It won’t last forever, though, and if you aren’t retiring before the end of that coasting period, you’re likely going to find yourself in a very bad spot.

 

Final thoughts

 

I believe the general trend of enterprises viewing technology as a commodity, rather than a potential competitive advantage, is foolish and shortsighted. Technology has the ability to streamline, augment, and enhance the business processes that directly face a business’ customers. That being said, ignoring business trends is a good way to find yourself behind the curve, and recognizing reality doesn’t necessarily indicate that you agree with the direction. Be cognizant of the way that businesses are employing technology and craft a personal growth strategy that allows you to remain relevant, regardless of what those future decisions may be. Cloud skills are king in the new technology economy, so don’t be left without them. Focusing on automation and orchestration will help you stay relevant in the future, as well. Whatever it is that you choose to do, continue learning and challenging yourself and you should do just fine.