Raise your hand if you have witnessed firsthand rogue or shadow IT. This is when biz, dev, or marketing goes directly to cloud service providers for infrastructure services instead of going through your IT organization. Let's call this Rogue Wars.

 

Recently, I was talking to a friend in the industry about just such a situation. They were frustrated with non-IT teams, especially marketing and web operations, procuring services from other people’s servers. These rogue operators were accessing public cloud service providers to obtain infrastructure services for their mobile and web app development teams. My friend's biggest complaint was that his team was still responsible for supporting all aspect of ops, including performance optimization, troubleshooting, and remediation, even though they had zero purviews or access into the rogue IT services.

 

They were challenged by the cloud’s promise of simplified self-service. The fact that it's readily available, agile, and scalable was killing them softly with complexities that their IT processes were ill prepared for. For example, the non-IT teams did not leverage proper protocol to retire those self-service virtual machines (VMs) and infrastructure resources that form the application stack.That meant that they were paying for resources that no longer did work for the organization. Tickets were also being opened for slow application performance, but the IT teams had zero visibility to the public cloud resources. For this reason, they could only let the developers know that the issue was not within the purview of internal IT. Unfortunately, they were handed the responsibility of resolving the performance issue.

 

This is how the easy button of cloud services is making IT organizations feel the complex burn. Please share your stories of rogue/shadow IT in the comments below. How did you overcome it, or are you still cleaning up the mess?