There’s no doubt that over the past couple of years the cloud as gone from a curiosity to a core component of many companies IT organizations.  Today Amazon AWS and Microsoft Azure are well known commodities and the cloud-based Office 365 has proven to be popular for businesses as well as well as consumers.  Today it’s even common for many business applications to be cloud based. For instance, SalesForace.com is a popular Software-as-a-Server (SaaS) application and many organizations have moved to cloud-based email. However, one notable holdout has been database applications. While there certainly are cloud-based database options business have been more than a little reticent to jump abroad the cloud for their databases.

 

Why the reluctance to move to the cloud?

 

The fact of the matter is that for most organizations their relational databases are the core of their IT infrastructure. Business critical applications are built on top of those databases and availability is paramount. While businesses can tolerate some downtime in their email downtime connectivity problems with their relational databases are unacceptable.  While there’s no doubt that internet and cloud connectivity is better than at any point in the past it this past year’s well publicized outages have shown that it’s far from perfect.

 

And then of course there are the control and security issues. Many organizations are just uncomfortable moving their data off premise. While the security of most cloud providers exceeds the average IT organization putting your critical data into someone else’s hands is a matter a trust that many organizations are not willing to make. When you data is on-premise and backed up you know you can restore it – the control remains within your own organization.  That’s not the case if your data is in the cloud. There you need to depend on the cloud provider

 

Another key issue for many international organizations is data sovereignty. In many countries like Canada, businesses are required by law to keep their data within their countries borders. In the past this has been a hurdle for many cloud providers as cloud servers could be located anywhere and they are not typically aligned with national boundaries. This is beginning to change as some cloud providers are beginning to support national data boundaries.

 

Where Cloud Database Fit Best?

 

So does this all mean that databases will never make to the cloud? The answer is clearly no. While established medium and enterprise sized businesses may have reservations about moving to the cloud, the cloud can make a lot of sense for smaller business and startups. Using the cloud can result in considerable capital savings for new businesses. SMB that may be faced with considerable hardware upgrade costs could also find the cloud to be a compelling alternative. Just as important is the fact that cloud database move many of the maintenance tasks like patching and upgrades into the hands of the cloud vendor freeing the business from them.

 

The move to cloud databases is far from inevitable but cost and labor savings make it a compelling option for new businesses and SMBs. In the next posting I’ll look at what happens if you do make that jump to the cloud.