My first experience in the IP domain was that of a shock!

 

I had moved from the optical transport domain in an operator to the IP department.

 

As an optical guy, I used Network Management system (NMS) for all tasks including configuration, fault and performance measurements. Above all, I liked the nice Graphical User Interface (GUI) of NMS.

 

However, I found that in the IP world, Command Line (CLI) is used for everything; from provisioning to troubleshooting. CLI rules in the IP domain.

 

“CLI is the tool for Engineers”, I was told.

 

OK fine! This may have something to do with my personal preference that I do not like the user interface of CLI or because I came from optical background, that this stuff seemed strange to me.

 

Irrespective of the user interface, and with all functionality that CLI provides,from my perspective, CLI is not the ideal tool for configuration. First, it focuses on a single box i.e. configuring box by box, which is cumbersome.  Second, it is to prone to human error and because of errors sometimes troubleshooting takes considerable time. And lastly, it is vendor specific so changing a vendor box needs a totally different skill-set to configure a box.

 

Therefore, as an operator, in my view, there is a need for a more flexible way of configuring/ service provisioning. The focus should move out from “box configuration” towards “network configuration”. Also, in this age of emerging technologies like SDN and NFV, where NMS is the primary focus; CLI will simply block the innovation.

 

Network configuration is a major part of the operators' OPEX. Studies put it around 45% of the total TCO of the network.

 

CLI has a place today because the management protocol -SNMP itself is not ideal for service provisioning. That is why operators are using SNMP primarily for monitoring purpose, not for configuration purposes.

 

Both CLI and SNMP, also, do not support one another important requirement for large complex service provider networks. That is they do not support transactional mode for network configuration.

 

Transaction enables multiple configurations to take place as one transaction or fail completely (All or none). To clarify this very important point, take an example of IPTV service that involves configuring one router, two switches, two firewalls and a billing system.  A transactional protocol   enables configurations on all involved network elements or NONE. This is beneficial because if there is any problem of configuration validation on even one network element, the configuration would fail on all other network elements.  This means that configuration would never be implemented partially on some network elements. This is the essence of “network configuration” as we talked earlier.

 

So do we have to live with SNMP and CLI for network configuration, forever?

 

No!

 

The NETCONF YANG protocol, developed by IETF for network management, has a single focus and that is configuring network as easy as possible. IETF learned from the experience of SNMP on what can be improved and approached the new protocol in ground up fashion. It is purpose built for configuring network.

 

NETCONF is the management protocol primarily for network configuration while Yang is text based modeling language designed to be used with NETCONF. Both are needed for a complete flexible service provisioning in IP networks.

 

There are FOUR main features of NETCONF YANG:

 

  1. Support of Transactionality:  Configurations can be applied to multiple network elements as one transaction to either succeed or otherwise.
  2. Get configuration feature. This is distinct advantage compared to SNMP. With SNMP backup config. is available but it is polluted with operational data ( Alarms, statistics); with NETCONF one can just have the configuration data.
  3. Vendor device independence. NETCONF can be used as standard configuration protocol for any vendor. The vendor’s box will sequence the configurations and execute them. This sequencing is internal to the vendor’s box and NETCONF does not need to be aware of it.
  4. Multiple network elements can be configured at one time thus saving time, configuring the network.

 

Therefore in summary, NETCONF is the right solution to solve network management issues in standard way. It is the next generation of network management protocol, which will reduce the time to provision services for an operator and will help in applying multiple configurations to multiple network elements at one time.

 

Now it is your turn to tell me:

 

  1. How do you feel about CLI as a network configuration tool, would you like to live with it forever?
  2. What issues do you face, using CLI? If there are any.
  3. Do you think NETCONF can deliver better than SNMP/CLI?

 

Would love to hear your opinion!