Of all of the security techniques, few garner more polarized views than interception and decryption of trusted protocols. There are many reasons to do it and a great deal of legitimate concerns about compromising the integrity of a trusted protocol like SSL. SSL is the most common protocol to intercept, unwrap and inspect and accomplishing this has become easier and requires far less operational overhead than it did even 5 years ago. Weighing those concerns against the information that can be ascertained by cracking it open and looking at its content is often a struggle for enterprise security engineers due to the privacy implied. In previous lives I have personally struggled to reconcile this but have ultimately decided that the ethics involved in what I consider to be violation of implied security outweighed the benefit of SSL intercept. With other options being few, blocking protocols that obfuscate their content seems to be the next logical option, however, with the prolific increase of SSL enabled sites over the last 18 months, even this option seems unrealistic and frankly, clunky. Exfiltration of data, being anything from personally identifiable information to trade secrets and intellectual property is becoming a more and more common "currency" and much more desirable and lucrative to transport out of businesses and other entities. These are hard problems to solve.

Are there options out there that make better sense? Are large and medium sized enterprises doing SSL intercept? How is the data being analyzed and stored?