Success. It marks the subtle difference between being productive and being busy. WordStream and MobileMonkey founder, Larry Kim, eloquently wrote about the 11 differences between busy people and productive people in a recent Inc. article. It is a great read that offers an interesting take on productivity. For instance, one of the eleven differences that Larry calls out is that productive people have a mission for their lives, while busy people simply look like they have a mission. The key is to correctly identify your purpose and the corresponding work that will fulfill your life's mission. There is no template for your mission because only you can define those core policies. Otherwise, it's someone else's mission. In the latter instance, you have less understanding of what "good" should look like, therefore you will be less efficient and effective in your work. 

 

So how do the productive versus busy insights play out in IT environments? Let's take the example of automation, one of the DART-SOAR skills. Many pundits believe that automation's objective is to save time--to do more stuff. This is what it means to be busy. In actuality, automation's true aim is not to save time, but rather to improve consistency of delivery, reliability of delivered services, and a normalized experience at scale. This exemplifies what it means to translate automation into productivity and deliver meaningful value.

 

Translating your skills, experience, and expertise into business value is how you make your career as a professional. Without business value, you won't have value.

 

Let me know what you think below in the comment section.